Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Orlando in Orange County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Atlantic Coastline Station

 
 
Atlantic Coastline Station Marker (side 1) image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, December 22, 2016
1. Atlantic Coastline Station Marker (side 1)
Inscription.  (side 1)
In 1880, the South Florida Railroad built a railway through Orlando. The small community boomed with land speculators, citrus and cattle investors, and tourists. In 1902, the larger Atlantic Coastline Railroad acquired the South Florida Railroad. Although three earlier Orlando stations were located on Church Street, Atlantic Coastline hired architect M.A. Griffith to design a new station on Sligh Boulevard in 1926. Griffith traveled the Pacific Coast and drew inspiration from Spanish architecture and colonial parish churches. The W.T. Hadlow Construction Company of Jacksonville received a $300,000 construction contract for the Spanish Mission style building. Twin bell towers, arches, parapet, and tile roof reflect this influence. Griffith designed the letters of "ORLANDO" over the west entrance arch. When the station was dedicated in January 1927, it attracted a crowd of more than 6,000 and became an immediate icon. The racially segregated station included a separate waiting room with ticket windows and restrooms for African American passengers on the south side of the building. Built-in curved wooden settees, once featured
Atlantic Coastline Station Marker (side 2) image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, December 22, 2016
2. Atlantic Coastline Station Marker (side 2)
Click or scan to see
this page online
in both waiting rooms, remain only in the current waiting room.
(Continued on other side)
(side 2)
(Continued from other side)
Known historically as the Atlantic Coastline Railroad Station, this building represented the city's efforts to encourage tourism in Orlando during the 1920s Florida Land Boom. Since its opening, the station has served as a passenger terminal for residents, visitors, and workers. The words "Seaboard Coast Line" on the east arched parapet replaced "Atlantic Coast Line" after the two rail companies merged in 1967. The station was documented by the Historic American Buildings Survey with six drawing sheets archived in the Library of Congress. On February 27, 1978, it was designated as an Orlando Historic Landmark. An extensive renovation began in 2014 to restore the station including the original wood doors and windows. Careful research revealed original colors of the building, window sills, and domes. In 2015, the project won the City of Orlando's Historic Preservation award for Outstanding Commercial Rehabilitation. The station is considered the largest and finest example of Mission Revival architecture in Central Florida and is the only train station of this style in the state. The station serves Amtrak's Silver Meteor and Silver Star Lines and the SunRail commuter train.
 
Erected
Atlantic Coastline Station Marker and station image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, December 22, 2016
3. Atlantic Coastline Station Marker and station
2016 by The City of Orlando and the Florida Department of State. (Marker Number F-904.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureRailroads & Streetcars. A significant historical year for this entry is 1926.
 
Location. 28° 31.572′ N, 81° 22.895′ W. Marker is in Orlando, Florida, in Orange County. Marker is at the intersection of Sligh Boulevard and West Copeland Drive, on the right when traveling south on Sligh Boulevard. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1400 Sligh Avenue, Orlando FL 32806, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Dr. Phillips House (approx. ¾ mile away); Carver Court Public Housing Complex (approx. ¾ mile away); a different marker also named Carver Court Public Housing Complex (approx. 0.8 miles away); Mount Pleasant Baptist Church (approx. one mile away); Bumby Hardware (approx. one mile away); Orlando's First Settler, Aaron Jernigan (approx. one mile away); Orange County 9-11 Memorial (approx. 1.1 miles away); Orlando’s Round Building (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Orlando.
 
Atlantic Coastline Station image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, December 22, 2016
4. Atlantic Coastline Station
Atlantic Coastline Station platform image. Click for full size.
By Tim Fillmon, December 22, 2016
5. Atlantic Coastline Station platform
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 17, 2017. It was originally submitted on January 16, 2017, by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida. This page has been viewed 316 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 16, 2017, by Tim Fillmon of Webster, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=100895

Paid Advertisement
Apr. 11, 2021