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Lookout Mountain in Hamilton County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
MISSING
SEE LOCATION SECTION
 

Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23

 
 
Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker image. Click for full size.
1. Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker
Inscription.  November 23d, 1863, under instructions from Gen. Grant to ascertain whether the Confederates still occupied the valley, Gen. Thomas disposed forces in front of Fort Wood, the site of which is now marked by the stand-pipe of the water works.
The movement was directed against Orchard Knob, which was the right of the Confederate advanced line, and the low range running south from it.
The center of Gen. Thomas' line was T. J. Wood's Division with Sheridan's on its right.
Baird's was in support of Sheridan and Schurz's and Steinwehr's supported Wood on the left. At 2 P.M. the center advanced with a rush, Wood directing his left (Willich's Brigade) on Orchard Knob, and his right (Hazen's Brigade) on the rifle pits to the south of it, Sam Beatty's Brigade in reserve. After sharp fighting Wood carried the central line.
Sheridan was then moved forward in support. The Confederate works were reversed and occupied by Wood. The line attacked by Wood was held by troops of Manigault's Brigade, which fought till overwhelmed under the misapprehension that they had been directed to hold their line at all hazards. The 11th Corps advanced
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on the left to Citico Creek.
The Union troops held their new line until the advance on Missionary Ridge Nov. 25.
 
Erected 1890 by the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park Commission. (Marker Number MT-1A.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is November 23, 1863.
 
Location. Marker is missing. It was located near 35° 0.759′ N, 85° 20.627′ W. Marker was in Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, in Hamilton County. Marker could be reached from Point Park Road north of East Brow Road, on the right when traveling west. This tablet was once located in Point Park, atop Lookout Mountain, just beyond the Ochs Museum and the museum observation deck, on the rock surface that makes up "The Point" of Lookout Mountain. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Lookout Mountain TN 37350, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Tennessee River and Moccasin Bend (here, next to this marker); Battle Above the Clouds (here, next to this marker); 29th Pennsylvania Infantry (here, next to this marker); Cobham's Brigade (here, next to this marker); Lookout Valley and Browns Ferry (a few steps from this marker); Chattanooga and Missionary Ridge
Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker image. Click for full size.
Image courtesy of the National Park Service., July 27, 2017
2. Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker
Aerial view of the eight tablets that were once situated atop "The Point" on Lookout Mountain.
(a few steps from this marker); Battle of Missionary Ridge (a few steps from this marker); 111th Pennsylvania Infantry (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lookout Mountain.
 
More about this marker. When standing on the Ochs Museum observation deck, and looking at the rock surface of "The Point" of Lookout Mountain, that the museum is situated upon, there used to be eight tablets located across the rock surface of "The Point." When looking left to right, this tablet was the third of the eight tablets that were situated there.
 
Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker image. Click for full size.
Image courtesy of the National Park Service., July 27, 2017
3. Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker
Closer aerial view of the eight tablets that were once situated atop "The Point" on Lookout Mountain.
Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker image. Click for full size.
Image courtesy of the National Park Service., July 28, 2017
4. Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker
View of the picture where the National Military Park's historian, Jim Ogden, identified each of the eight missing tablets.
Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dale K. Benington, July 28, 2017
5. Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker
A present day view of "The Point," as seen from the observation deck of the Ochs Museum, shows where this tablet was once situated.
Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dale K. Benington, August 1, 2012
6. Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker
View of the double of this tablet that is currently situated over on Cameron Hill.
Entrance to Point Park image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dale K. Benington, July 28, 2017
7. Entrance to Point Park
View of the entrance to "The Point" National Military Park, where this tablet is located.
The Text from the Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Dale K. Benington, July 27, 2017
8. The Text from the Battle of Chattanooga, 1st Day, Nov. 23 Marker
View of page 1A from the National Park Service’s record book on the Chattanooga - Chickamauga ”MT-numbered” listings of classified structures, which is kept in the Chickamauga Battlefield Park's Visitor Center.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 11, 2019. It was originally submitted on August 1, 2017, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 231 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on August 1, 2017, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.

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May. 29, 2024