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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Charlestown in Washington County, Rhode Island — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Liberty Tree Memorial

 
 
Liberty Tree Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 14, 2017
1. Liberty Tree Memorial Marker
Inscription.  
This American Liberty Elm was named after "The Liberty Tree: Our Country's first Symbol of Freedom." On the morning of August 14, 1765, the people of Boston awakened to discover two effigies suspended from an elm tree in protest of the hated Stamp Act. From that day forward that elm became known as "The Liberty Tree." It stood in silent witness to countless meetings, speeches and celebrations, and became the rallying place for the Sons of Liberty. In August of 1775, as a last act of violence prior to their evacuation of Boston, British soldiers cut it down because it bore the name "Liberty."
 
Erected by Elm Research Institute, Keene, NH.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker memorial is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary. In addition, it is included in the Historic Trees series list.
 
Location. 41° 22.31′ N, 71° 39.867′ W. Marker is in Charlestown, Rhode Island, in Washington County. Marker is on Park Lane south
Liberty Tree Memorial Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 14, 2017
2. Liberty Tree Memorial Marker (wide view)
of Old Post Road (Rhode Island Route 1A), on the right when traveling south. Marker and subject Elm tree are inside Ninigret Park, near the north corner of the first abandoned airstrip tarmac segment encountered after entering the park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5 Park Lane, Charlestown RI 02813, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Charlestown Naval Auxiliary Landing Field Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Grumman F6F-5N Hellcat Crash (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Ninigret (approx. 1.1 miles away); Fort Ninigret Marker (approx. 1.3 miles away); General Joseph Stanton Monument (approx. 2.8 miles away); Samuel Ward Birthplace Site (approx. 5.8 miles away); Seventh Day Baptist Minister's Monument (approx. 7.2 miles away); First Seventh Day Baptist Church of Hopkinton (approx. 7.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charlestown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Liberty Tree Site.
One block east of Boylston Station (Green Line) and Boston Common, at Washington and Essex Streets, is the site of the famous Liberty Tree. Embedded in the wall of the building located at 630 Washington Street is a tablet marking the spot of the historic landmark, bearing the inscription "Sons of Liberty, 1766." (Submitted on March 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The American Liberty Elm.
The state tree of both Massachusetts and North Dakota, American
Liberty Tree Memorial Marker (<i>wide view; Liberty Elm tree left of marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 14, 2017
3. Liberty Tree Memorial Marker (wide view; Liberty Elm tree left of marker)
elm is a beautiful tree but subject to getting a serious disease called Dutch elm disease or DED. The good news is that resistant tree strains are starting to improve the American elm's situation. Elm Research Institute (ERI) has developed on of the best, called the American Liberty Elm, and offers matching grants to groups who want to plant the tree. (Submitted on March 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Ninigret Park Sign image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 14, 2017
4. Ninigret Park Sign
Sign marks the entrance to Ninigret Park. The Liberty Tree Memorial marker is south of this sign.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 9, 2020. It was originally submitted on March 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 97 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Aug. 5, 2020