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Greeley in Weld County, Colorado — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

A Camp 202 Prisoner

 
 
A Camp 202 Prisoner Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, June 30, 2018
1. A Camp 202 Prisoner Marker
Inscription.  On March 3, 1943, during World War II, German Sergeant Erich Geissler was wounded in North Africa, captured by the English, and then transferred to the Americans. The prisoners were shipped to Norfolk, Virginia, where they boarded a train for Camp 202 in Greeley, arriving during January 1944.

In an October 13, 2003, letter to the Greeley Museums, translated from German, Geissler described prison life at Camp 202. He stated that initially each prisoner received new clothes. All outer wear "was labeled with crackly white letters that said PW (prisoner of war) on the back."

When a soccer field was built at Camp 202, all "twelve companies of men organized teams, and for three thousand prisoners, this provided suspenseful entertainment. Team jerseys were made from undershirts that the kitchen staff had dyed with red beets, onions, green vegetables. . ."

A few of the prisoners, including Geissler, objected to working for the American enemy. Geissler labored "at the oven with an iron, freelancing and ironing clothing for the fellow prisoners (pants, ten cents; shirt, ten cents; jacket, thirty cents)." Most of the
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rest of the prisoners worked on local farms for 80 cents a day.

Following the end of the war in May 1945, Geissler began his journey home and lived in Fichtelberg, Germany, until his death in 2006. Geissler's 2003 letter closed with: "I thank God frequently, that I was able to spend a portion of that dreadful war... in Colorado. So it was for me, all in all, even as a prisoner, a part of my life that will always continue to be a good memory for me, Thank You, Greeley."

Photo captions
Top left: German Soldier, Sergeant Erich Geissler c1942 Image courtesy of the Geissler Family

Bottom left: Fences, Guard Towers and Dogs - Camp 202; Between 1943 and 1946 Image shows the mesh-wire fence three meters high topped with another one-meter high fence made of barbed wire erected parallel to a second similar fence. Between the fences were guard dogs. Every 100 meters there was a watch tower, each of these had two spotlights for strong security both day and night. Image courtesy of the City of Greeley Museums, ID# 1976.83.0007

Top right: Camp 202 Entryway Guardhouse - c1944 Image courtesy of the City of Greeley Museums, ID# 2006.47.0026

Bottom right: Geissler Family - c1955 Erich Geissler is seen here with his three children; Selma, Winfried, and Gerd. Image courtesy of the Geissler Family
A Camp 202 Prisoner Marker is just to left of the small pine. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, June 30, 2018
2. A Camp 202 Prisoner Marker is just to left of the small pine.
The P.O.W. Camp was in the background.

 
Erected 2011 by the National Park Service, Colorado Historical Society, and the City of Greeley.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Notable PlacesWar, World II. A significant historical month for this entry is January 1944.
 
Location. 40° 25.27′ N, 104° 51.019′ W. Marker is in Greeley, Colorado, in Weld County. Marker is on Colorado Route 257 north of West 10th Street (Business U.S. 34), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Greeley CO 80634, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. POW Camp #202 (here, next to this marker); Greeley P.O.W. Camp 202 (here, next to this marker); German Prisoner of War Camp 202 (a few steps from this marker); Loveland (approx. 4.3 miles away); #3 Ditch Marker (approx. 7.8 miles away); Masonic Temple (approx. 8.2 miles away); The Pioneer Fountain (approx. 8.3 miles away); Replica of the Statue of Liberty (approx. 8.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greeley.
 
Also see . . .  Greeley History on Camp 202. (Submitted on July 21, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
View from marker towards intersection of Highway 257 and Business U.S. 34. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Mark Hilton, June 30, 2018
3. View from marker towards intersection of Highway 257 and Business U.S. 34.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 21, 2018. It was originally submitted on July 21, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 279 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 21, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

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May. 29, 2024