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Deadwood in Lawrence County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Deadwood's Carnegie Library

 
 
Deadwood's Carnegie Library Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2018
1. Deadwood's Carnegie Library Marker
Inscription.  Andrew Carnegie, steel tycoon and philanthropist, is best known for his charitable contributions in financing public libraries. From 1886 until his death in 1919, Carnegie supported the construction of 1,679 public libraries across the United States. In South Dakota, twenty-five libraries, including the one before you, were built through Carnegie's charitable contributions. Deadwood would become the sixth South Dakota community to apply for and receive funds in the amount of $15,000 dollars for the construction of the library.

Deadwood's library would not have been possible without the hard work and perseverance of the Round Table Club and the Deadwood Womans Club. In 1899, these women's literary groups joined forces to promote the creation of a public library. Within four years, ground for the new library was officially broke on March 28, 1904. Plans from Deadwood architect Charles A. Randall were adopted by the City Commission and called for a one story building to be built in the Greek Style of architecture. An interesting exterior feature of the library included the white sandstone retaining wall from the Burke Quarry in Hot Springs,
Marker detail: Portrait of Andrew Carnegie, 1835-1919 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
2. Marker detail: Portrait of Andrew Carnegie, 1835-1919
South Dakota. Prior to being placed in front of the library, the wall was on display in the South Dakota exhibit at the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair.

On November 8, 1905, the library was officially dedicated in front of a large crowd of spectators. Deadwood Mayor Edward McDonald delivered a thought provoking speech on the importance of a public library and its benefit on the community. Today Deadwood's Carnegie Library still continues to serve the Deadwood citizens and visitors in the capacity of a library, archives, and research facility.
 
Erected by The Deadwood Historic Preservation Commission.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ArchitectureCharity & Public WorkEducation. In addition, it is included in the Carnegie Libraries series list.
 
Location. 44° 22.585′ N, 103° 43.913′ W. Marker is in Deadwood, South Dakota, in Lawrence County. Marker is at the intersection of Williams Street and Denver Avenue, on the right when traveling north on Williams Street. Marker is located on the left side of the library main entrance from Williams Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 435 Williams Street, Deadwood SD 57732, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Black Hills Trust and Savings Bank (within shouting distance of this marker);
Marker detail: Digging the foundation for the new Deadwood Carnegie Library, April 19, 1904 image. Click for full size.
Adams Museum Collection, Deadwood History, Inc.
3. Marker detail: Digging the foundation for the new Deadwood Carnegie Library, April 19, 1904
Generations of Change (within shouting distance of this marker); Ride High, T.C., Ride High (within shouting distance of this marker); Serving the Black Hills (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Waite Block Annex (about 300 feet away); Spanish-American War Memorial (about 300 feet away); Deadwood Changing -- 1884 1902 and Now (about 400 feet away); Jack McCall Capture Site (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Deadwood.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large composite plaque, mounted horizontally on waist-high posts.
 
Also see . . .  How Andrew Carnegie Turned His Fortune Into A Library Legacy. Andrew Carnegie was once the richest man in the world. Coming as a dirt poor kid from Scotland to the U.S., by the 1880s he'd built an empire in steel — and then gave it all away: $60 million to fund a system of 1,689 public libraries across the country. Carnegie libraries are still the best buildings in many towns. Over the years some have been expanded or torn down. And, in addition to books and computers, Carnegie libraries find new ways to serve the community. (Submitted on September 14, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Deadwood's Carnegie Library Entrance (<i>marker visible at left</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2018
4. Deadwood's Carnegie Library Entrance (marker visible at left)
Deadwood's Carnegie Library (<i>marker visible just left of entrance</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2018
5. Deadwood's Carnegie Library (marker visible just left of entrance)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 19, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 112 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Oct. 26, 2020