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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lead in Lawrence County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Homestake Gas-Powered Locomotive

 
 
Homestake Gas-Powered Locomotive Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2018
1. Homestake Gas-Powered Locomotive Marker
Inscription.  This gas-powered locomotive was operated as a tramway locomotive, hauling ore in the Trojan Mining District, west of Lead. The mines serviced by this locomotive were the Clinton, the Two Johns, and the Trojan. The ore from these mines was hauled to the Bald Mountain Mining Company's mills. This locomotive was in operation from 1918 until 1959 when the Bald Mountain Mine was closed.

Gas powered locomotives could only be used on the surface. Due the emissions of a gas engine, these styles of engines were not allowed underground.

This locomotive was constructed by the H.K. Porter Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
 
Erected by Black Hills Mining Museum.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars.
 
Location. 44° 21.125′ N, 103° 45.889′ W. Marker is in Lead, South Dakota, in Lawrence County. Marker is on West Main Street (CanAm Highway) (U.S. 85) west of Julius Street, on the right when traveling west. Marker is located beside
Homestake Gas-Powered Locomotive Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2018
2. Homestake Gas-Powered Locomotive Marker (tall view)
Click or scan to see
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the sidewalk, on the north side of West Main Street, west of the Homestake Visitor Center. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lead SD 57754, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pneumatic Rock Drill (within shouting distance of this marker); Sweatman Art Memorial / Finnish Lutheran Church (within shouting distance of this marker); The First National (Norwest) Bank (within shouting distance of this marker); The Homestake Gold Mine and Open Cut (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Homestake One Ton, End Dump Ore Car (about 300 feet away); Homestake Air Locomotive Number 35 (about 300 feet away); Homestake Open Cut Mine (about 300 feet away); Commonwealth Mine Stamp Mill (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lead.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a metal plaque, mounted horizontally on a waist-high post.
 
Also see . . .
1. The H.K. Porter Company. Production reached it's all-time yearly peak of nearly 400 units built in 1906. With changing technologies and the advent of gasoline powered engines Porter built the company's first gas mechanical locomotive in 1911. Improvements in locomotive technology allowed Porter to build it's first "Fireless" locomotive in 1915 by using larger pressure vessels to store both steam and superheated water in usable quantities on board the locomotive. Again, Porter was rapidly able to dominate this small specialized market. (Submitted on August 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. H.K. Porter, Inc.
Homestake Gas-Powered Locomotive Marker (<i>wide view; locomotive in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2018
3. Homestake Gas-Powered Locomotive Marker (wide view; locomotive in background)
H.K. Porter, Inc. manufactured light-duty railroad locomotives in the US, starting in 1866. The company became the largest producer of industrial locomotives, and built almost eight thousand of them. The last locomotive was built in 1950, but the company continues to produce industrial equipment to this day. Porter was known for building locomotives that were much smaller than those normally used by the larger railroads. The company's locomotives were small enough that they were often operated by only one person. Porter built mostly steam locomotives, but they also built some powered by gasoline and diesel engines, and some that ran on compressed air. (Submitted on August 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Homestake Gas-Powered Locomotive image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2018
4. Homestake Gas-Powered Locomotive
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 14, 2018. It was originally submitted on August 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 145 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 4, 2022