Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lynch in Harlan County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Railroad Station

 
 
Railroad Station Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 20, 2017
1. Railroad Station Marker
Inscription.  This railroad depot was finished in 1925. One of the few brick structures in Lynch because the stone quarries were closed by this date.

This was a busy station, serving two passenger trains daily through the forties and then one train a day until L&N Railroad discontinued passenger service to Lynch on January 1, 1956.

The building was then converted to a central warehouse. With the closing of the 31 mine, the building was converted into a bathhouse.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars. A significant historical year for this entry is 1925.
 
Location. 36° 57.906′ N, 82° 55.047′ W. Marker is in Lynch, Kentucky, in Harlan County. Marker is at the intersection of West Main Street (Kentucky Route 160) and Church Street, on the left when traveling west on West Main Street. Marker is located on the Portal 31 Exhibition Mine grounds, on the south side of West Main Street and on the west side of the railroad station. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 Portal 31 Circle, Lynch KY 40855, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Restaurant Building (within shouting distance of this
Railroad Station Marker (<i>wide view; Lynch railroad station in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 20, 2017
2. Railroad Station Marker (wide view; Lynch railroad station in background)
Click or scan to see
this page online
marker); Lynch Firehouse (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lamp House No. 2 (about 300 feet away); No. 31 Mine Portals (about 400 feet away); No. 31 Mine Shop (about 400 feet away); History of Lynch (about 400 feet away); Winifrede Mine Conveyor (about 500 feet away); Mine Ventilating Fan (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lynch.
 
More about this marker. This is a large, painted metal, "billboard-style" marker.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Portal 31 Exhibition Mine, Lynch, Kentucky
 
Also see . . .  Louisville and Nashville Railroad (Wikipedia). The Louisville and Nashville Railroad (reporting mark LN), commonly called the L&N, was a Class I railroad that operated freight and passenger services in the southeast United States. Chartered by the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1850, the road grew into one of the great success stories of American business. Operating under one name continuously for 132 years, it survived civil war and economic depression and several waves of social and technological change. Since all locomotives of the Gilded Age were steam-powered, many railroads had favored coal as their engines' fuel source after wood-burning
US Steel Locomotive with Lynch Railroad Station background image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 20, 2017
3. US Steel Locomotive with Lynch Railroad Station background
models were found unsatisfactory. The L&N guaranteed not only its own fuel sources but a steady revenue stream by pushing its lines into the difficult but coal-rich terrain of eastern Kentucky. (Submitted on August 17, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Additional commentary.
1. Once upon a time, you could travel to anywhere by rail from this railroad station
Lynch was the last stop on the L&N branch line from Pineville. Pineville was a junction on L&N’s Cumberland Valley Division whose primary line that ran from Corbin to Middlesboro, near the Cumberland Gap. Corbin was on the L&N main line between Louisville and Atlanta via Knoxville.

1925 timetables show two trains leaving Lynch for Pineville every day, one at 7:55 a.m. and the other at 4:45 p.m. They arrived at Pineville, some 63 miles away, about 3½ hours later. The returning trains from Pineville arrived Lynch at 10:40 a.m. and 9:35 p.m. The morning train from Lynch connected to the 1:15 p.m. train for the 1½ hour ride from Pineville to Corbin, and the afternoon train connected with the 11 p.m. train from Pineville to Corbin.

At Corbin, the morning traveler from Lynch could catch the 4:08 p.m. train to Louisville, arriving there that evening
US Steel Locomotive #102 (<i>located near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 20, 2017
4. US Steel Locomotive #102 (located near marker)
at 9:20 p.m. The afternoon traveler from Lynch took the overnight train to Louisville that stopped at Corbin at 1:47 a.m. and got to Louisville at 7:28 a.m.

If the destination was Knoxville or Atlanta, the morning traveler from Lynch would have to spend the night at Corbin and catch the 7 a.m. train the next morning, but the afternoon traveler would spend a few bleary hours in the Corbin waiting room until the train from Cincinnati to Atlanta came by at 2:31 a.m. That was Train No. 21, and on arrival at Knoxville at 5:40 a.m., a dining car would be added to serve breakfast before arriving at Atlanta at 11:35 a.m.

If you were traveling further, there were plenty of long distance trains to choose from at Atlanta and at Louisville to take you most anywhere you wanted to go in North America, including Canada and Mexico. The ticket agent at Lynch would staple together all the tickets you needed to reach your ultimate destination.
    — Submitted December 31, 2020, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.
 
1917 Louisville & Nashville (L&N) Railroad Caboose (<i>located near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 20, 2017
5. 1917 Louisville & Nashville (L&N) Railroad Caboose (located near marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 1, 2021. It was originally submitted on August 14, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 118 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 17, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=121699

Paid Advertisement
Oct. 20, 2021