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Callicoon in Sullivan County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Erie Train Station

Callicoon

 
 
Erie Train Station Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., July 30, 2018
1. Erie Train Station Marker
Inscription.  

Welcome Iron Horse

The Erie Railroad Company was incorporated on the 24th of April 1832. Active work began in 1836 but with rugged hills, mountain barriers, spanning rivers and deep ravines with bridges and viaducts, political opposition, the financial crisis of 1836 and a disastrous fire in New York City that bankrupt many of the backers held up the project. By 1842 the company was deeply in debt. With the aid of New York State the work continued. The first pick was struck into the ground at Callicoon on the 14th of March 1847. In December of 1848 the first engine was driven through Callicoon. Finally, in May of 1851, the Erie officially opened for business. To celebrate, the company ran an excursion train carrying such notables as President Fillmore, Daniel Webster and local State Senator James Clark Curtis. The train did not stop as scheduled but slowed through town for the townspeople. Local businessman, Peter Traynor seized the banner that had been prepared for this event and handed it to the brakeman on the rear platform as it passed. The banner read: "The Iron Horse from the Hudson is Welcome to Drink

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of the Waters of the Callicoon."

In 1847 there was only one house in Callicoon Depot. Thousands of laborers immigrated from Ireland and Italy to help lay the tracks. Some stayed and established homes and businesses. Callicoon sprang into prominence as house after house was built and it soon developed into the most important business station between Port Jervis and Susquehanna.

In 1847 surveyor Solomon Royce printed hand bills and circulars in the German language praising the assets of northwestern Sullivan County. Royce developed a lucrative real estate business. More than 250 German families settled in the Towns of Cochecton, Callicoon and Fremont. On the 1st of March 1869 the Town of Cochecton was divided and the western portion was re-named the Town of Delaware which now encompasses the hamlet of Callicoon.

Callicoon Depot Trivia:
There was an indoor and outdoor ticket window, opening to the station agent's office.

The passenger waiting room had a large round radiator in the middle of the room.

The station agent's office and ticket counters were located on the east side of the building.

The Western Union Telegraph office was located on the west side.

The "limited" trains would only stop at the station with advanced noticed [sic] that there was a passenger needing to board.

The Binghamton Press, our daily newspaper at the time, was

Erie Train Station Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., July 30, 2018
2. Erie Train Station Marker
bundled and tossed off the trains at the station.

The mail bags were simply hooked to a pole along the track so the conductor could retrieve them without fully coming to a stop.

Callicoon Depot's name was changed to Callicoon in 1906.

In 1888, a round-trip ticket to New York cost $5.75.

[Photo captions, clockwise from top right, read]
• During the summer months Erie trains were loaded with passengers bound for area resorts. Extra cars had to be added to the trains for the influx of Callicoon tourists. The "Callicoon Special" line was added on Saturdays arriving in Callicoon at 6pm. This was a great convenience for businessmen who wanted to spend weekends with their families in the country. Summer visitors arrived aboard the Erie until the 1960's.

• Erie Railroad logo from 1888.

• [Postcard] The Arrival of the New York Train[,] Callicoon-on-the-Delaware, N.Y.

• Near the old Olympia Hotel stood a stone octagon water tower. The platform that once supported the tower is still visible. This was the source of water in the days of steam engines. Steam engines were replaced by diesel in the 1950's.

• [Bottom postcard] "The Iron Horse from the Hudson is Welcome to Drink of the Waters of the Callicoon."

• By the 1940's the lounge and passenger cars of the Erie had air-conditioning and experienced an increase in passenger travel.

Erie Railroad Passenger Station (looking SE) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., July 30, 2018
3. Erie Railroad Passenger Station (looking SE)
• The original train station, located between Upper and Lower Main Street, burned in 1898. The present station was built to replace it in 1899.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesRailroads & StreetcarsSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #13 Millard Fillmore series list. A significant historical date for this entry is March 14, 1847.
 
Location. 41° 45.978′ N, 75° 3.464′ W. Marker is in Callicoon, New York, in Sullivan County. Marker is at the intersection of Lower Main Street (County Route 133) and the connector to Upper Main Street, on the right when traveling west on Lower Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 32 Lower Main Street, Callicoon NY 12723, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Town of Delaware (here, next to this marker); Kautz Memorial Building (within shouting distance of this marker); St. James Church and Rectory (approx. ¼ mile away); Philip F. Gottschalk (approx. 3.6 miles away); Hankins (approx. 3.6 miles away); Jersey Claim Line (approx. 3.8 miles away); Heirsville (approx. 3.9 miles away); Hankins Stone Arch Bridge (approx. 3.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Callicoon.
 
Also see . . .
Erie Railroad Passenger Station (looking west) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By William Fischer, Jr., July 30, 2018
4. Erie Railroad Passenger Station (looking west)

1. History of the Town of Callicoon NY. (Submitted on August 15, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Erie Railroad History (Erie-Lackawanna Railroad Historical Society). (Submitted on August 15, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 15, 2018. It was originally submitted on August 15, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 488 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 15, 2018, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.

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Apr. 18, 2024