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Arkadelphia in Clark County, Arkansas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Clark County Confederate Memorial

C. S. A.

 

— 1861 — 1865 —

 
Clark County Confederate Memorial (north face). image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 2, 2018
1. Clark County Confederate Memorial (north face).
Inscription.  
East face
When the last trumpet
is sounded, may each one
answer the roll call
of the heavenly army.


South face
"The principles for
which they fought live
eternally." erected by
the Harris Flanagin Chapter, U.D.C.
to the memory of the soldiers
of the Southern Confederacy
whose invincible courage made
a hundred battle fields famous
and whose unselfish devotion to
principle made their cause glorious.

West face
"On fame's eternal camping
ground/their silent tents are
spread; and glory guards with
solemn round
the bivouac of the dead."

 
Erected 1911 by the Harris Flanagin Chapter No. 1184 of the Arkansas Division, U.D.C.
 
Topics and series. This memorial is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy series list.
 
Location. 34° 7.117′ N, 93° 3.065′ W. Marker is in Arkadelphia, Arkansas, in Clark County. Memorial is at the intersection of Clay Street and Court Street, on the right when traveling east on Clay Street. Located on the east side of the Clark County Courthouse. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 320 Clay Street, Arkadelphia AR 71923, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 4 other
Clark County Confederate Memorial (west face) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 2, 2018
2. Clark County Confederate Memorial (west face)
Click or scan to see
this page online
markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Clark County (a few steps from this marker); Confederate Manufacturing / The Military Road (approx. 4.4 miles away); Skirmish at Bozeman's House (approx. 5.8 miles away); Military Road / Settlement of Midway (approx. 10.8 miles away).
 
More about this memorial. The sculpture was knocked from its base and was damaged during a tornado on March 1, 1997. The monument was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on May 3, 1996. The soldier's head was stolen, but was recovered two years later after a reward was posted. The sculpture was subsequently restored and returned to its base. It was designed and executed by R. P. Phillips.
 
Regarding Clark County Confederate Memorial. Description: A Civil War soldiers stands in uniform, his proper left foot forward. With two hands he clasps the barrel of his rifle, the butt of which rests on the ground. He wears a wide-brimmed hat. A blanket roll hangs over his proper left shoulder and a canteen hangs over his proper right shoulder. A scabbard is attached to his belt on his proper left side. The sculpture is mounted atop a shaft with a stepped base. Two crossed flags appear in relief on the front of the base. Source: Smithsonian AmericanArt Museum Inventory of American Sculpture.
 
Also see . . .  Encyclopedia of Arkansas History. (Submitted on August 17, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Clark County Confederate Memorial (east face). image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 2, 2018
3. Clark County Confederate Memorial (east face).
Clark County Confederate Memorial (south face) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 2, 2018
4. Clark County Confederate Memorial (south face)
Clark County Confederate Memorial at the Clark County Courthouse. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 2, 2018
5. Clark County Confederate Memorial at the Clark County Courthouse.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 3, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 17, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 133 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 17, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

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Sep. 21, 2021