Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Lolo in Missoula County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Soldiers as Naturalists

 
 
Soldiers as Naturalists Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, May 10, 2018
1. Soldiers as Naturalists Marker
Captions: (bottom center) On this section of the trail, some of the plants they recorded included grand fir, subalpine fir, wester larch, Englemann spruce, whitebark pine, lodgepole pine, mountain lady's slipper, common snowberry, and western huckleberry.; (bottom right) Along Lolo Creek and over the Bitterroot Mountains, Lewis and Clark recorded several animals they'd never seen before: ruffed grouse, spruce grouse, mourning dove, Steller's jay and the broad-tailed hummingbird.
Inscription.  Lewis and Clark’s “CORPS OF DISCOVERY” was the first major expedition launched by the United States to explore new lands with an emphasis on scientific inquiry. Lewis spent months being tutored in both physical and biological sciences in preparation for the expedition.
Jefferson’s letter of instruction admonished Lewis and Clark to bring home scientific, anthropological, and geological information.

“Your observations are to be taken with great pains & accuracy, to be entered distinctly, & intelligibly for others as well as for yourself ... several copies of these, as well as your other notes, should be made at leisure times & put into the care of the most trustworthy of your attendants to guard by multiplying them, against the accidental losses to which they will be exposed.”


Many plants and animals familiar to American Indians in the West were unknown to the people in the eastern United States before the Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1804. In fact, President Jefferson instructed Lewis to keep an eye out for mastodons! They kept detailed journals of “new”
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Click or scan to see
this page online
species they observed. They also shipped bird skins, furs and even live animals -- four magpies, one sharp-tailed grouse and one prairie dog -- from Fort Mandan, North Dakota, back to Jefferson in Washington, D.C.

The Lewis and Clark Expedition camped here on September 12, 1805.
 
Erected by U.S. Forest Service.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ExplorationNatural Features. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #03 Thomas Jefferson, and the Lewis & Clark Expedition series lists. A significant historical date for this entry is September 12, 1805.
 
Location. 46° 44.718′ N, 114° 31.134′ W. Marker is near Lolo, Montana, in Missoula County. Marker is on Lolo Creek Road (U.S. 12) near Forest Road 4232, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 37833 US Highway 12, Lolo MT 59847, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 7 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cycles and Circles (approx. 3.1 miles away); Lewis and Clark Route (approx. 7.6 miles away in Idaho); Lolo Summit (approx. 8.1 miles away in Idaho); Lewis and Clark (approx. 8.1 miles away in Idaho); Nez Perce Trail (approx. 8.2 miles
Soldiers as Naturalists Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, May 10, 2018
2. Soldiers as Naturalists Marker
away in Idaho); Lolo Trail Crossing (approx. 11 miles away in Idaho); Checkerboard Legacy (approx. 11 miles away in Idaho).
 
Original specimen of the Clarkia pulchella, preserved by Lewis image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Meriwether Lewis
3. Original specimen of the Clarkia pulchella, preserved by Lewis
Drawings from the Journals of Lewis and Clark image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Meriwether Lewis
4. Drawings from the Journals of Lewis and Clark
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 15, 2020. It was originally submitted on September 10, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 211 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 10, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.

Share this page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=123129

CeraNet Cloud Computing sponsors the Historical Marker Database.
This website earns income from purchases you make after using our links to Amazon.com. We appreciate your support.
Paid Advertisement
Jul. 12, 2024