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Tunnel Hill in Whitfield County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Tunnel Hill

 
 
Tunnel Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, November 10, 2007
1. Tunnel Hill Marker
Inscription.  May 7, 1864. The Federal forces, under Maj. Gen. W.T. Sherman, began the campaign for Atlanta by seizing Tunnel Hill. Howard's 4th A.C., having marched from Catoosa Springs, drover Wheeler's Cav. from the R.R. tunnel S. to Mill Creek Gap. Palmer's 14th A.C., moving from Ringgold (U.S. Highway 41), supported Howard on his right and extended the Federal front to Mill Cr. Gap, where its rt. joined left of 20th A.C. in Dogwood Valley. These operations were designed to engage the Confederate forces at Dalton, while McPherson's army moved from the W. to Snake Creek Gap, 18 miles S. of Tunnel Hill.
 
Erected 1985 by Georgia Historical Marker. (Marker Number 155-24.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 34° 50.394′ N, 85° 2.52′ W. Marker is in Tunnel Hill, Georgia, in Whitfield County. Marker is on Clisby Austin Drive east of Oak Street, on the left when traveling east. Located at the Western & Atlantic Railroad Tunnel Museum. Touch for map
Tunnel Hill Marker is on the left of three at the museum. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 19, 2019
2. Tunnel Hill Marker is on the left of three at the museum.
. Marker is at or near this postal address: 215 Clisby Austin Drive, Tunnel Hill GA 30755, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Clisby Austin House (here, next to this marker); Western & Atlantic Railroad Tunnel (here, next to this marker); Baggage Carts (a few steps from this marker); Tunnel Hill W&A Railroad Depot (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Tunnel Hill (within shouting distance of this marker); The Excavation (approx. 0.4 miles away); Crow Valley (approx. 2.6 miles away); Mill Creek Gap (approx. 2.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tunnel Hill.
 
Also see . . .
1. Tunnel Hill, Georgia. (Submitted on October 11, 2008, by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia.)
2. The Ghosts of Tunnel Hill, Georgia. Just for fun reading! (Submitted on October 11, 2008, by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia.) 

3. Tunnel Hill Heritage Center & Museum. (Submitted on November 26, 2019, by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia.)
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
Tunnel Hill W&A Tunnel image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, November 10, 2007
3. Tunnel Hill W&A Tunnel
The Heritage Center offers walking tours of the tunnel.
Gated Tunnel image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, November 10, 2007
4. Gated Tunnel
The rails are gone and a new active tunnel was built beside it on the other side of the chain link fence.
Waud, Alfred R. (Alfred Rudolph) Sketch of Tunnel Hill, Georgia image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher
5. Waud, Alfred R. (Alfred Rudolph) Sketch of Tunnel Hill, Georgia
Tunnel can be seen near center of sketch, Clisby Austin House at right.
Courtesy Library of Congress
Tunnel Hill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 19, 2019
6. Tunnel Hill Marker
 

More. Search the internet for Tunnel Hill.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 26, 2019. This page originally submitted on October 11, 2008, by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,956 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 11, 2008, by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia.   2. submitted on November 20, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   3, 4. submitted on October 11, 2008, by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia.   5. submitted on October 1, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   6. submitted on November 20, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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