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Waukesha in Waukesha County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Silurian Spring

 
 
Silurian Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Paul F, October 5, 2010
1. Silurian Spring Marker
Inscription.  Silurian Spring is a natural flowing spring situated on an elevation 50’ above the Fox River. David Jackson, the first postmaster of Waukesha (which was then known as Prairieville), built his log cabin west of the present day spring and used the water. David Smeaton named and promoted the spring in 1874. From that time through the 1930’s, Silurian water was bottled and shipped nationwide from this spring. A beautifully landscaped park once existed on this site with a bath house, pond, roller coaster, bandstand and bottling plant. Guests crowded to the Park to hear concerts and drink the water. The Casino Theater was located behind the spring. Popular touring plays were presented there every summer. This structure was built in 1926. Since the city acquired the park in 1941, the structure has been restored numerous times and has served as a reminder of Waukesha’s Spring Era. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Local Waukesha Landmark.
 
Erected 2018 by City of Waukesha Landmarks Commission Springs Committee. (Marker Number 34-14.)
 
Topics. This historical marker
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is listed in these topic lists: Natural ResourcesNotable Places. A significant historical year for this entry is 1874.
 
Location. 43° 0.577′ N, 88° 13.371′ W. Marker is in Waukesha, Wisconsin, in Waukesha County. Marker can be reached from Post Office Circle, 0.1 miles west of East Broadway Street and North Hartwell Avenue. Marker is located in Waukesha Spring Park, North Hartwell Avenue, but is most easily accessible from Post Office Circle, off East Broadway. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Waukesha WI 53186, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. New Tribes Bible Institute (approx. ¼ mile away); Courthouse Complex (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Waukesha Freeman (approx. 0.3 miles away); American Legion Home (approx. 0.4 miles away); Rotunda (approx. 0.4 miles away); Waukesha Civic Theatre (WCT) (approx. 0.4 miles away); Carroll College (approx. half a mile away); Waukesha City - Cutler Park (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Waukesha.
 
More about this marker. Marker was redone by the City of Waukesha Landmarks Commission Springs Committee.
 
Additional commentary.
1. Current
Silurian Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Linda Hansen, September 29, 2018
2. Silurian Spring Marker
status of Spring

Today this spring is housed in a stone structure that sits behind the current Waukesha Post Office and YMCA in a city park.
    — Submitted May 27, 2011, by Linda Hansen of Waukesha, Wisconsin.
 
Silurian Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Paul F, October 5, 2010
3. Silurian Spring Marker
Silurian Spring image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Paul F, October 5, 2010
4. Silurian Spring
Front door to spring building
Silurian Spring image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Paul F, October 5, 2010
5. Silurian Spring
Plaque on the side of spring building
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 27, 2018. It was originally submitted on October 11, 2010, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 3,387 times since then and 269 times this year. Last updated on October 8, 2018, by Linda Hansen of Waukesha, Wisconsin. Photos:   1. submitted on October 11, 2010, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin.   2. submitted on October 8, 2018, by Linda Hansen of Waukesha, Wisconsin.   3, 4, 5. submitted on October 11, 2010, by Paul Fehrenbach of Germantown, Wisconsin. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 20, 2024