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Rock Hill in St. Louis County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Fairfax House

 
 
Fairfax House Marker (Left Plaque) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), October 7, 2018
1. Fairfax House Marker (Left Plaque)
Inscription.  
[Plaque to the left of the door]
Faifax House
This house, built circa 1841, by James Collier Marshall an early resident of the Rock Hill area, is one of the oldest homes along Manchester Road, in St. Louis County, Missouri

Marker placed by Webster Groves Chapter, DAR
July 18, 2004


[Plaque to the right of the door]
National Register of Historic Places
Listed April 2004

Fairfax House

circa 1841
Home of James and Elizabeth McCausland Marshall
Pioneer family of Rock Hill

Rock Hill Historic Preservation Commission
July 2004

 
Erected 2004 by Webster Groves Chapter, DAR; Rock Hill Historic Preservation Commission.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Settlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution series list. A significant historical month for this entry is April 2004.
 
Location. 38° 36.651′ N, 90° 21.787′ W. Marker is in Rock Hill
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, Missouri, in St. Louis County. Marker is on South McKnight Road north of Manchester Road (Missouri Highway 100), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2800 South McKnight Road, Saint Louis MO 63119, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Original site of Rock Hill Presbyterian Church (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Stories That Shape Our Culture (approx. ¾ mile away); The Rock House/Edgewood Children's Center (approx. ¾ mile away); Douglass School (approx. 0.9 miles away); Clarence Barbre (approx. 0.9 miles away); Historic Black Churches in Webster Groves (approx. 0.9 miles away); Roll of Honor (approx. 0.9 miles away); Webster Groves War Memorial (approx. 1.3 miles away).
 
Fairfax House Marker (Right Plaque) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), October 7, 2018
2. Fairfax House Marker (Right Plaque)
Fairfax House image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), October 7, 2018
3. Fairfax House
Information on display in the window image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), October 7, 2018
4. Information on display in the window
The Fairfax House


The Fairfax Story
The James Collier Marshall Home, known as The Fairfax House, was built between 1839 and 1841 in the area now known as Rock Hill, Missouri. Fairfax is the oldest remaining braced timer construction home in the state.

Fairfax was built on Marshall land which consisted of almost 900 acres from Brentwood to Ladue to Glendale and Webster Groves. Therefore, the Fairfax House represents the history before the history of the area during American westward expansion and the Civil War.

The house currently resides at 9401 Manchester Road, across from its original location and still on former Marshall land.

In 2004, The Fairfax House was placed on the National Register of Historic Place.

Distinguished History
James Collier Marshall was a pioneer and entrepreneur. Along with his brother John and their wives, he established a trading post and stage coach stop near where the Trainwreck Saloon currently resides in Rock Hill. This was a place to rest and resupply for coaches traveling old Highway 100 between St. Louis and Jefferson City.

Marshall also built a school, operated a US Post Office, and co-founded the Rock Hill Presbyterian Church which stands alongside the current Fairfax location.

James Marshall's wife, Elizabeth Kyle McCausland Marshall, was also the aunt of famous Civil War General John McCausland (below).

Restoration Project
Over the years, The Fairfax House has fallen into disrepair and is now in need of extensive restoration.

Significant strides were made in 2008 and 2009 when three exterior walls were restored (above). However, the rear wall and completed interior are still significantly decayed and in danger of imminent ruin from the elements.

Because of its current condition, The Fairfax House was placed on the 2008 and 2009 Ten Most Endangered Historic Properties List by the Missouri Alliance for Historic Preservation.

Volunteers and donors are needed to save Fairfax. Learn how you can help at www.fairfaxhouse.org.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 10, 2019. It was originally submitted on October 14, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 761 times since then and 84 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 14, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 23, 2024