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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Glenns Ferry in Elmore County, Idaho — The American West (Mountains)
 

Motor Homes Without Motors

 
 
Motor Homes Without Motors Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2018
1. Motor Homes Without Motors Marker
Inscription.  Contrary to popular belief, the emigrant wagon was not the large heavy Conestoga that is represented by the Idaho Bicentennial Wagon. Instead, many people used wagons from their farms or purchased smaller, lighter wagons at the start of their journey.
It was important that the wagon be small and light enough for the oxen to manage yet sturdy enough to withstand the rigorous 2,000 mile trek. In 1847, Chester Ingersoll, an early Oregon Trail emigrant, wrote, "The wagon should be made of a wide tracks, with a box 22 to 24 inches high and about 11 feet long."
The wagon was constructed from hardwood such as oak, hickory, or maple. Oxen were most often used to pull the wagons however, horses and mules were sometimes used.
The hopes and dreams of the emigrant's life in Oregon were dependent upon the reliable service of their wagon.

The Emigrant Bill of Goods

Notice that there are no seats in the wagon. Because most of the wagon box was laden with supplies for the journey, there was little room for passengers. Except for the ill or very young, most emigrants walked beside the wagon.
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In his "Emigrant's Guide to California," Joseph E. Ware advised the emigrant to supply their wagons with the following items for a party of four:

824 lbs. flour • 725 lbs. bacon • 75 lbs. coffee • 160 lbs. sugar • 200 lbs. lard • 200 lbs. beans • 135 lbs. peaches or apples • 25 lbs. salt • pepper • bicarbonate of soda • tin plates • spoons • coffee pot • camp kettle • knives

Total cost for these items including the wagon, stock and harness in 1842 was $220.78.
 
Erected by Idaho State Parks and Recreation.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Roads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the Oregon Trail series list.
 
Location. 42° 56.484′ N, 115° 19.314′ W. Marker is near Glenns Ferry, Idaho, in Elmore County. Marker is on Three Island State Park near West Madison Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Glenns Ferry ID 83623, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Oregon Trail (a few steps from this marker); Idaho's Bicentennial Wagon (a few steps from this marker); The Three Island Ford (a few steps from this marker); To All Pioneers
Motor Homes Without Motors Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2018
2. Motor Homes Without Motors Marker
The marker is at the center.
(within shouting distance of this marker); "A Most Dangerous Crossing" (approx. 0.9 miles away); Over 500 Miles Step-by-Step (approx. 0.9 miles away); Site 1 ★ Two Island Crossing (approx. 1.2 miles away); Glenn's Ferry (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Glenns Ferry.
 
More about this marker. This marker is located at the wagons shelter in Three Island State Park.
 
The Wagon Shelter image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Barry Swackhamer, May 16, 2018
3. The Wagon Shelter
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 31, 2018. It was originally submitted on October 31, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 212 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 31, 2018, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.

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Jul. 17, 2024