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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Woodbridge in Middlesex County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Cross Keys Tavern

 
 
Cross Keys Tavern Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, August 3, 2018
1. Cross Keys Tavern Marker
Inscription.  
Built in the early half of the 18th century, Cross Keys Tavern took its name from the Continental term “Cross Keys” denoting an important intersection. The two most important roads in colonial Woodbridge met at the present-day intersection of Main Street and Amboy Avenue. The tavern was also known as Manning’s Tavern, after the innkeeper, John Manning, the first postmaster of Woodbridge. The building was moved in the 1920s to its present location at 142 North James Street.

One of the tavern’s most famous guests was President George Washington, who spent the night of April 22, 1789 at the tavern en route to New York for his oath of office as President of the United States. On September 24, 1824, Gilbert de Motier, the Marquis de Lafayette, also stopped here on his way to Philadelphia. Cross Keys tavern served as “the place of the Town Meeting from 1824 to 1848”, when it ceased operation.

Cross Keys Tavern is credited as the site of the first raising in Woodbridge of the new American Stars and Stripes flag by Revolutionary War patriot Janet Pike Gage (1748-1821), know as the “Molly Pitcher of
The marker is in the vicinity of the gazebo. image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, October 20, 2018
2. The marker is in the vicinity of the gazebo.
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Woodbridge”. Assisted by an African-American man named Joe, Gage erected a Liberty Pole bearing the new national flag in fron of the tavern shortly after the end of the war. Gage’s nephew, Zebulon Pike (1779-1813), spent time in Woodbridge as a child before becoming a U.S. Army Brigadier General and discovering Pike’s Peak in 1806.

More information visit www.wthpc.org
Woodbridge Township Historic Preservation Commission
Mayor John E. McCormac Woodbridge Township 2013

 
Erected 2013 by Woodbridge Township Historic Preservation Commission.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansColonial EraGovernment & PoliticsPatriots & Patriotism. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #01 George Washington, the George Washington Slept Here, and the Lafayette’s Farewell Tour series lists. A significant historical date for this entry is April 22, 1789.
 
Location. 40° 33.379′ N, 74° 16.999′ W. Marker is in Woodbridge, New Jersey, in Middlesex County. The marker is on a footpath that runs through Bernie Anderson Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Woodbridge NJ 07095, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Shinn-Woodbridge Airport (a few steps from this marker); Methodist Episcopal Church & Parsonage (within shouting
Inset image. Click for full size.
3. Inset
Cross Keys Tavern, looking east. The wing in the foreground is no longer present.
distance of this marker); The Parish Community of St. James (within shouting distance of this marker); Woodbridge (within shouting distance of this marker); William Cutter House (within shouting distance of this marker); Adath Israel Synagogue (within shouting distance of this marker); Revolutionary War Battles in Woodbridge (within shouting distance of this marker); Fulton Street Neighborhood (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Woodbridge.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, August 3, 2018
4. Inset
Present day Judging from the numerous mailboxes, it appears to have been divided up into rentals.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 6, 2020. It was originally submitted on October 31, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 231 times since then and 67 times this year. Last updated on November 5, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 31, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.

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Oct. 20, 2021