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Huntington in Cabell County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Raid on Guyandotte / Burning of Guyandotte

 
 
Raid on Guyandotte side of marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, September 29, 2018
1. Raid on Guyandotte side of marker
Inscription.  
On the night of November 10, 1861, Confederate cavalry led by Colonels John Clarkson and Albert Jenkins raided the town of Guyandotte and surprised Union recruits of the 9th WV Infantry. Following a heated battle, Confederate soldiers and citizens of the town captured 98 Union troops and supporters. On November 11, the captives began a hard trek to prisons in the South.

As the Confederates withdrew from the town on November 11, 1861, the S.S. Boston appeared with Union troops of the 5th WV Infantry and Ohio Home Guards. They marched into Guyandotte and burned homes businesses and churches. Sixteen secessionists were arrested and imprisoned. The burning of the town was due in part to its reputation as a “hot bed of secession.”
 
Erected 2016 by West Virginia Archives & History.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the West Virginia Archives and History series list. A significant historical date for this entry is November 10, 1861.
 
Location. 38° 25.73′ N, 82° 23.329′ 
Burning of Guyandotte side of marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, September 29, 2018
2. Burning of Guyandotte side of marker
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this page online
W. Marker is in Huntington, West Virginia, in Cabell County. Marker is on Main Street north of Hagan Street, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 226 Main St, Huntington WV 25702, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Guyandotte (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Battle of Guyandotte (about 300 feet away); First Cabell County Court House (about 300 feet away); Madie Carroll House (about 400 feet away); Granville Parker (about 400 feet away); Historic Carroll House (about 400 feet away); John S. Witcher (about 400 feet away); Guyandotte (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Huntington.
 
Also see . . .  The Tragic Fate of Guyandotte. 1995 article by Joe Geiger, Jr. in West Virginia History, volume 54.
“Confederate sympathy remained rampant in Cabell County, especially in Guyandotte. Property and livestock were stolen from Union sympathizers and some were forced to flee into Ohio.11 On May 25, when merchandise bound for a Guyandotte resident was seized as contraband in Proctorville, Ohio, some of Guyandotte’s citizens threatened to cross the Ohio River and take the goods by force. Nearly two hundred members of the local Ohio Home Guard gathered to repel any ‘invasion.’ Responding to fears expressed by some Guyandotte citizens, the Ironton Register stated that ‘if the people of Guyandotte keep that traitor flag down, and attend
Burning of Guyandotte Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats
3. Burning of Guyandotte Marker
to their own affairs, they need not be at all afraid of trouble from loyal citizens of the Government.’ Although no fighting occurred and tempers cooled, Guyandotte’s reputation was further blemished in the eyes of Union supporters.” (Submitted on November 6, 2018.) 
 
Raid on Guyandotte / Burning of Guyandotte Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By J. J. Prats, September 29, 2018
4. Raid on Guyandotte / Burning of Guyandotte Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 18, 2022. It was originally submitted on November 6, 2018, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 346 times since then and 92 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 6, 2018, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.

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Jul. 5, 2022