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Monticello in Jefferson County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Jefferson County Sesquicentennial

1827-1977

 
 
Jefferson County Sesquicentennial Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, November 14, 2018
1. Jefferson County Sesquicentennial Marker
Inscription.  When Florida’s Territorial Legislative Council established Jefferson County in January, 1827, settlers from the seaboard states already had begun to develop cotton plantations in this area. In December, 1827, the county seat received the name Monticello in honor of Thomas Jefferson’s famous Virginia home. Jefferson County provided many of territorial Florida’s most prominent leaders, including representatives to Congress and the Legislative Council, territorial judges, and the state’s first elected governor, William D. Moseley. Jefferson County citizens were instrumental in establishing the Democratic party in Florida and in attaining statehood in 1845. As southerners who advocated states’ rights and opposed the abolition of slavery, they took leading roles in Florida’s 1861 secession from the Union and in the military service of the Confederacy. For decades after the Civil War, Jefferson County reflected north Florida’s economic changes and problems, attaining prominence in agriculture and related light industries. In more recent times, the county has continued its significant participation in Florida’s development in the political and agricultural
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Erected 1977 by Jefferson County Historical Association & Florida Department of State. (Marker Number F-279.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Government & PoliticsPolitical Subdivisions. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #03 Thomas Jefferson series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1827.
 
Location. 30° 32.721′ N, 83° 52.205′ W. Marker is in Monticello, Florida, in Jefferson County. Marker is at the intersection of Jefferson Street (Courthouse Circle) (U.S. 19) and Washington Street (U.S. 90), on the left when traveling north on Jefferson Street (Courthouse Circle). Marker is located on the Jefferson County Courthouse grounds, beside the walkway leading to the main north courthouse entrance. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1 Courthouse Circle, Monticello FL 32344, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jefferson County Florida Confederate Memorial (here, next to this marker); Perkins Opera House (within shouting distance of this marker); "Meeting Oak" (within shouting distance of this marker); The Town of Monticello (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Monticello Methodist Church (about 700 feet
Jefferson County Sesquicentennial Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, November 14, 2018
2. Jefferson County Sesquicentennial Marker (tall view)
away); Jefferson County High School (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Girardeau House (approx. half a mile away); Ernest I. Thomas Memorial (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Monticello.
 
Also see . . .
1. Jefferson County, Florida. Jefferson County was created in 1827. It was named for Thomas Jefferson, third President of the United States of America, who had died the year before the county's establishment. (Submitted on November 14, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. William Dunn Moseley. Florida became the 27th state of the Union on March 3, 1845, and in the first statewide election for governor that year, Moseley successfully ran against one of the best-known public figures in the state, former territorial Governor Richard Keith Call. (Submitted on November 14, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Jefferson County History & Culture. Settlement of Jefferson County was spurred both by its proximity to Tallahassee, the newly selected capital, and by the suitability of its soil for cotton cultivation. Early settlers bought large tracts of virgin forest, or, if they could, the old fields of the Indians. They cleared this land to plant cotton. The county quickly acquired its first school, the Jefferson Academy, and
Jefferson County Civil War Confederate Soldier Monument (<i>in front of courthouse; near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, November 14, 2018
3. Jefferson County Civil War Confederate Soldier Monument (in front of courthouse; near marker)
a courthouse. Its prosperity suffered in the late 1830's when many of the settlers went to fight in the Seminole War. While Jefferson County held its own in agriculture after the Civil War, it failed to gather a large share of the new tourist trade. (Submitted on November 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Jefferson County Sesquicentennial Marker (<i>Jefferson County Courthouse north side</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, November 14, 2018
4. Jefferson County Sesquicentennial Marker (Jefferson County Courthouse north side)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 16, 2018. It was originally submitted on November 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 348 times since then and 87 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 14, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.

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Jun. 23, 2024