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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Three Forks in Gallatin County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Second Gallatin City

1865-1880's

 
 
Second Gallatin City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2013
1. Second Gallatin City Marker
Inscription.  In front of you is the site of Gallatin City, 1865-1880's. After it became obvious that steamboats could not operate economically from Fort Benton to the Headwaters, the town was relocated from the north side of the river to this location. Sitting astride the main stage and wagon routes, agricultural products from the Gallatin Valley passed through Gallatin City to the gold camps of Bannack, Virginia City and Helena. The town died quickly when the railroad bypassed it in the 1880's and commerce moved to more convenient points.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Settlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 45° 55.211′ N, 111° 29.925′ W. Marker is near Three Forks, Montana, in Gallatin County. Marker is on Trident Road (State Highway 286) 1˝ miles north of Interstate 90, on the right when traveling north. Marker is located on the east side of the Headwaters of the Missouri picnic area parking lot, overlooking the Second Gallatin City site. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Three Forks MT 59752, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Colter’s Run (within shouting distance of this marker);
Marker detail: These are the last remaining structures of what was once Second Gallatin City image. Click for full size.
2. Marker detail: These are the last remaining structures of what was once Second Gallatin City
Gallatin City Hotel - 1868 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Log Cabin (about 400 feet away); Thomas-Frederick Flour Mill (about 500 feet away); Jefferson’s Instructions to Lewis and Clark (approx. half a mile away); The Naming of a River (approx. half a mile away); Lewis and Clark reach the Headwaters (approx. half a mile away); Missouri River Headwaters (approx. 1.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Three Forks.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Gallatin City, Missouri Headwaters State Park, Montana
 
Also see . . .  Gallatin City (Three Forks). In 1863 a settlement named Gallatin City (the first of three) sprang to life opposite the mouth of the Gallatin River under the hands of twenty-five pioneers, including James Gallaher and Major J. B. Campbell, by authorization of the first Territorial legislature. All were inspired by the prospect that river commerce would be extended to the Three Forks valley as soon as a government-chartered shortline railroad was built around the Great Falls.
Marker detail: Original Gallatin City Plat image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Original Gallatin City Plat
They expected that their market area would include all the gold camps from Virginia City to the south and Helena to the north, as well as the Yellowstone Valley via Clark's "high dry firm road" between the Big Bend and the head of the Gallatin River. Second thoughts dictated the moving of the first Gallatin City's legal domain to a new location on the bank of the Madison River about two miles south, on the stage route. Hope survived in Gallatin City (No. 2) until the Northern Pacific Railroad laid its main line several miles to the south, and new options—the foundations of another phase of Western history—emerged. A third Gallatin City briefly came to mind, but no farther. (Submitted on December 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 4, 2018. It was originally submitted on December 1, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 70 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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Mar. 3, 2021