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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richardson in Dallas County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

McKamy Spring

 
 
McKamy Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, December 9, 2018
1. McKamy Spring Marker
Inscription.  Before any European or American settlers entered Texas, Native American tribes passed through the Richardson area and likely camped around what is now known as McKamy Spring. These tribes met with settlers, one of the friendliest being the Yoiuane (later absorbed by the Tonkawa). Comanche, Kiowa, Kickapoo, Seminoles and Cherokee around north Texas may have also used McKamy Spring, one of the few natural above ground springs still in existence in the area. The early American settlement of Breckenridge, which preceded Richardson, made frequent use of the spring then known as Bowser Spring. After a railroad line was built nearby, Breckenridge faded away as the new town of Richardson was built closer to the railroad. By 1925, the town became officially incorporated with Thomas McKamy as its first mayor.

Thomas Franklin McKamy was born in Carrollton in 1889. His family owned and operated a drug and general merchandise store in Richardson. After his father's death in 1907, McKamy and his brother took over the business. McKamy expanded into ownership of other businesses in the area. McKamy came to serve various positions in the local government,
McKamy Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, December 9, 2018
2. McKamy Spring Marker
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including mayor. He drew from Bowser Spring to supply water to the drills in constructing wells and water systems in the town. The spring also supplied water for machinery in the construction of the US Highway 75 Central Expressway. He later purchased the land around the spring and built a home there in 1953. The spring became renamed as McKamy Spring, and Thomas McKamy himself placed a marker there to acknowledge the original Native Americans who likely used the spring.
 
Erected 2015 by Texas Historical Commission.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 32° 56.537′ N, 96° 44.135′ W. Marker is in Richardson, Texas, in Dallas County. Marker is on Brick Road 0.2 miles north of East Spring Valley Road, on the right when traveling north. In McKamy Spring Park. You can see the actual spring that still feeds water out to a small creek. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 644 Brick Row, Richardson TX 75081, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Wheeler School (approx. 0.3 miles away); First Presbyterian Church of Richardson (approx. 0.8 miles away); First United Methodist Church Richardson (approx. one mile away); The Floyd Pioneer Cemetery
McKamy Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, December 9, 2018
3. McKamy Spring Marker
(approx. 1.2 miles away); Demonstration of the First Working Integrated Circuit (approx. 1.2 miles away); Richardson (approx. 1.3 miles away); First Baptist Church of Richardson (approx. 1˝ miles away); Blewett Cemetery (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richardson.
 
Additional commentary.
1. Name should be changed to Yoiuane Spring
"Before any European or American settlers entered Texas, Native American tribes passed through the Richardson area and likely camped around what is now known as McKamy Spring. These tribes met with settlers, one of the friendliest being the Yoiuane."
These people lived and died by that water, the marker should be a reminder of the native people who lived on this land before settlers came to this country. Let's honor these people and give this place a just name.

Note from the Editors: Thank you for your note and concern. This website is dedicated to documenting, transcribing and describing historical markers. We do not have any control over the wording or naming of this or any other markers in the database. Please contact local city or county authorities
McKamy Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, December 9, 2018
4. McKamy Spring Marker
for more follow up on your concern. Note also the secondary marker on the page which does include more appreciation of the spring's original users. All the best, HMdb.org.
    — Submitted October 16, 2019, by Michael Banks of Richardson, Texas.
 
McKamy Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, December 9, 2018
5. McKamy Spring Marker
McKamy Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, December 9, 2018
6. McKamy Spring Marker
McKamy Spring Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kayla Harper, December 9, 2018
7. McKamy Spring Marker
The Yoiuane Tribe of the Caddo group of Indians lived here as early as 1690 to 1840. They hunted buffalo and deer on the prairie. They used McKamy Spring as a watering place. It was from these friendly (Tejas) Indians that Texas got her name.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 17, 2019. It was originally submitted on December 10, 2018, by Kayla Harper of Dallas, Texas. This page has been viewed 238 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 10, 2018, by Kayla Harper of Dallas, Texas.   2. submitted on December 11, 2018, by Kayla Harper of Dallas, Texas.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on December 10, 2018, by Kayla Harper of Dallas, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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