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Battle in East Sussex, England, United Kingdom
 

William the Conqueror Trail

 

— Battle of Hastings, 1066 —

 
William the Conqueror Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 9, 2018
1. William the Conqueror Trail Marker
Inscription.  
William the Conqueror Trail
William,7th Duke of Normandy (1027-1087), set his stamp on the history of the Duchy of Normandy and of the Kingdom of England, their destinies becoming closely entwined for more than a century. The symbolic date 1066 marks the subjection of England by William the Conqueror and his Barons. By winning the Battle of Hastings William became King of England. He and his successors put down firm roots into English soil, reinforcing cultural, economic and political links between the Normans and the Anglo-Saxons. In memory of this giant of our two histories, the William the Conqueror Trail invites you to step back in time. Discover those places which were the setting for the main episodes of William's life and his victorious achievement.

Although traditionally called “The Battle of Hastings” the greatest conflict in English history took place here, and gave the simple name "Battle” to the charming market town that developed.

Historians generally agree now that the Abbey was founded when the papal authorities insisted the Normans do penance for the great loss of life
William the Conqueror Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 9, 2018
2. William the Conqueror Trail Marker
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incurred during the Conquest. The high altar was placed on the spot where Harold fell. Building started in 1070, and the abbey church was consecrated in 1094 in the presence of the Conqueror's son, King William Rufus.

The abbots at Battle were very powerful, and in the 14th century the Abbey played a vital role in defending the whole area against raids from the French; hence the fine fortified gatehouse (1338) and the wall walk. It was the Dissolution of the Monasteries under Henry VIII that brought the Abbey's power to an end. Battle Abbey estate stayed in private hands until 1976, when it was purchased for the nation. It is now in the care of English Heritage. An audio tour in several languages brings the battle and the splendid ruins to life.

Nearby, the beautiful parish church of St Mary the Virgin, founded in 1115, is only one of the fascinating historic buildings that make a stroll through the town worth while. Others can be seen on the Battle Town Trail, details of which are available from the Tourist Information Centre.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Notable Events.
 
Location. 50° 54.901′ N, 0° 29.139′ E. Marker is in Battle, England, in East Sussex. Marker is on High Street close to Park Lane, on the right when traveling south. Located
The Battle Abbey Museum image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 9, 2018
3. The Battle Abbey Museum
next to the Battle Abbey Museum at the Battle of Hastings Battlefield. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Battle, England TN33 0AD, United Kingdom. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Great Gatehouse (a few steps from this marker); The Battle of Hastings and Battle Abbey (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Great Gatehouse (a few steps from this marker); Battle town and the abbey’s estates (a few steps from this marker); On the very spot (within shouting distance of this marker); The Outer Court (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle Formation (about 150 meters away, measured in a direct line); The Cloister (about 150 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Battle.
 
Also see . . .  English Heritage - 1066 Battle of Hastings, Abbey and Battlefield. (Submitted on January 16, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 17, 2019. It was originally submitted on January 16, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 100 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 16, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.

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Oct. 22, 2021