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Near Wishram in Klickitat County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
 

View of Mount Jefferson

"he observed the snow clad top"

 
 
View of Mount Jefferson Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2015
1. View of Mount Jefferson Marker
Inscription.  William Clark took frequent side trips during the journey, sometimes climbing hills to get a better view of the surrounding countryside. On April 22, 1806, Clark scaled Haystack Butte, the highest hill on this side of the river (over your left shoulder). From atop this butte Clark had “an extensive view of the country” and noted, “I could plainly See the range of Mountains which runs South from Mt. Hood as far as I could See.

The “range of Mountains” Clark saw was the Cascade Range. From his higher viewpoint — now private property and not publicly accessible — Clark could clearly see Mount Jefferson. The explorers had first sighted “a high mountain SE. Covered with Snow which we call Mt. Jefferson” on March 30, 1806, naming the peak in honor of President Thomas Jefferson.

April 22, 1806
he observed the range of mountains in which Mount Hood stands to continue nearly south as far as the eye could reach. he also observed the snow clad top of Mount Jefferson which boar S. 10 W. Mount Hood from the same point boar S.
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30 W… Capt C. also discovered some timbered country in a Southern direction from him at no great distance.

— Meriwether Lewis

Mount Jefferson
Mount Jefferson stands 10,195 feet high and is one of 13 major volcanic peaks of the Cascade Range. Other peaks Lewis and Clark sighted include Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens, Mount Adams and Mount Hood. Although Mount Jefferson has not erupted in approximately 15,000 years, geologic evidence suggests large, violent eruptions occurred in the past.

The Cascades
From this viewpoint, lower than Captain Clark's, you can't see Mount Jefferson, but you can see 11,239-foot-high Mount Hood. The Cascade Mountains stretch from northern California to southern British Columbia. The range includes many snow-capped volcanoes, some of which are still active. Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980. The U.S. Geological Survey continuously monitors the seismic activity of the Cascades.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ExplorationLandmarks. In addition, it is included in the Lewis & Clark Expedition series list. A significant historical date for this entry is April 22, 1806.
 
Location. 45° 39.769′ N, 120° 57.381′ W. Marker is near Wishram, Washington, in Klickitat County. Marker is on Lewis and Clark Highway (State
View of Mount Jefferson Marker (<i>wide view; Wishram [right] and Columbia River in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2015
2. View of Mount Jefferson Marker (wide view; Wishram [right] and Columbia River in background)
Highway 14) 0.8 miles west of Wishram Road, on the left when traveling west. Marker is located in a large pull-out on the south side of the highway, overlooking the small town of Wishram and the Columbia River. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Wishram WA 98673, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Celilo Falls (here, next to this marker); Wyam (a few steps from this marker); Great Falls of the Columbia (a few steps from this marker); Class P-2 Engine No. 2507 (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Lewis and Clark Expedition (approx. 0.9 miles away in Oregon); Greatest Indian Fishery of the Northwest (approx. 0.9 miles away in Oregon); Ancient Indian Fishing Grounds (approx. 0.9 miles away in Oregon); Celilo Falls Fishing Grounds (approx. one mile away in Oregon). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Wishram.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a large composite plaque, mounted horizontally on a waist-high wooden post.
 
Also see . . .  Journals of the Lewis & Clark Expedition: April 22, 1806. Lewis: “there is no timber in this country we are obliged to purchase our fuel of the natives, who bring it from a great distance… The people at this place offered to sell us wood and dogs, and we therefore thought it better to remain all night… A man belonging to the next village proposed
Columbia River View from Overlook above Wishram (<i>view looking west from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, July 14, 2015
3. Columbia River View from Overlook above Wishram (view looking west from marker)
exchanging a horse for one of our canoes… We obtained 4 dogs and as much wood as answered our purposes on moderate terms… We can only afford ourselves one fire, and are obliged to lie without shelter, the nights are cold and days warm.
(Submitted on January 21, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 22, 2019. It was originally submitted on January 21, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 221 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 21, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.

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Mar. 4, 2024