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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Manlius in Onondaga County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Pompey Stone

Legends & Lore

 
 
Pompey Stone Marker image. Click for full size.
August 11, 2018
1. Pompey Stone Marker
Inscription.  1800s prank believed true. Engraved "Leo de L'N VI 1520" as memorial for 1500s explorer. Found 1820 near this site. 1894 hoax revealed.
 
Erected 2017 by William G. Pomeroy Foundation and New York Folklore Society. (Marker Number 28.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Anthropology & Archaeology. In addition, it is included in the William G. Pomeroy Foundation, and the William G. Pomeroy Foundation Legends & Lore Series series lists.
 
Location. 42° 56.373′ N, 75° 58.477′ W. Marker is in Manlius, New York, in Onondaga County. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3482 Watervale Road, Syracuse NY 13204, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Birthplace of Charles Mason (approx. 1.3 miles away); House c. 1835 (approx. 1.7 miles away); Site of Green's House (approx. 1.7 miles away); Indian Hill (approx. 2.1 miles away); a different marker also named Indian Hill (approx. 2.1 miles away); Pompey Academy
Pompey Stone Marker image. Click for full size.
August 11, 2018
2. Pompey Stone Marker
(approx. 3.3 miles away); Baptist Church (approx. 3.3 miles away); Roman Catholic Mission Church (approx. 3.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manlius.
 
Regarding Pompey Stone. The story behind the Pompey Stone spans nearly two centuries. In 1820, a local farmer Philo Cleveland reported finding the Stone when clearing his fields. The Stone, which is engraved “Leo De L’N VI 1520,” was believed for many years to be an authentic artifact from a Spanish explorer. In 1894, there were claims that two local men had doctored it in a blacksmith shop in nearby Oran, NY. The relic’s authenticity immediately fell into question and there’s been various stories about the hoax ever since. The field where the stone was found continues to be farmed to this day.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 24, 2019. It was originally submitted on January 23, 2019, by Deryn Pomeroy of Syracuse, New York. This page has been viewed 151 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 23, 2019, by Deryn Pomeroy of Syracuse, New York. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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Jan. 25, 2021