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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arlington in Arlington County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Making A Memorial

 
 
Making A Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, January 19, 2008
1. Making A Memorial Marker
Inscription.  The United States Marine Corps War Memorial stands as a symbol of our nation's high regard for the honored dead of the Marine Corps. Although the statue depicts one of the most famous events of World War II, the memorial is dedicated to all Marines who have given their lives in defense of the United States of America since 1775.

Shortly after the release of the Associated Press Press Photographer Joe Rosenthal's famous photo, sculptor Felix W. de Weldon, then on duty with the U. S. Navy, constructed a scale model followed by several life-sized statues inspired by the scene.

It was then proposed that the symbolic scene be immortalized in bronze. The Marine Corps War Memorial Foundation organized the fundraising and creation of the monument. After years of effort, Felix de Weldon and his assistants completed the statue.

The memorial, designed by Horace W. Peaslee, was officially dedicated by President Dwight D. Eisenhower on November 10, 1954. The entire cost of the memorial was $850,000 - all donated by Marines, Naval Service members and friends.

The 32-foot high bronze figures are shown erecting a 60-foot
Marine Corps War Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, January 19, 2008
2. Marine Corps War Memorial
flagpole at the top of Mount Suribachi on Iwo Jima. Burnished in gold on the Swedish granite are the names and dates of principal Marine Corps engagements since the founding of the Corps.

Caption of photo in upper right corner:
Felix de Weldon sculpting Rene Gagnon

Caption of photo in lower left corner:
Felix de Weldon sculpting the calf of Michael Strank
 
Erected by The National Park Service.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. It was located near 38° 53.381′ N, 77° 4.299′ W. Marker was in Arlington, Virginia, in Arlington County. Marker was on Marshall Drive near Richmond Highway. Touch for map. Marker was in this post office area: Fort Myer VA 22211, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Missions Critical (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); United States Marine Corps War Memorial (about 300 feet away); A Place Where Memories Are Made (about 300 feet away); A Split Second Made Immortal (about 500 feet away); The Marines' Fiercest Fighting of World War II (about 500 feet away); Something More Than A Statue (about 600 feet away); A Legacy Older than the Republic
Marine Corps War Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, January 19, 2008
3. Marine Corps War Memorial
(about 600 feet away); 70,000 Marines Helped Raise That Flag on Iwo Jima (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Arlington.
 
More about this memorial. This marker was replaced by a new one named Something More Than A Statue (see nearby markers).
 
Marine Corps War Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, January 12, 2008
4. Marine Corps War Memorial
This picture was taken with Ektachrome E100GX film
Memorial Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, January 12, 2008
5. Memorial Bridge
The Lincoln Memorial and Washington Monument can be seen in the background. This picture was taken with Ektachrome E100GX film.
Making A Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, September 2, 2015
6. Making A Memorial Marker
 

More. Search the internet for Making A Memorial.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 4, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 22, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 878 times since then and 27 times this year. Last updated on February 2, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 22, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   4, 5. submitted on January 28, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   6. submitted on September 8, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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