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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
St. Louis, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Willys Building

Built in 1917

 
 
Willys Building Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones, April 22, 2019
1. Willys Building Marker
Inscription.  This building, designed by the firm of Mills, Rhones, Bellman and Norhoff, was built by the Willys-Overland Co., to serve as the St. Louis distributorship for Willys Overland and Willys-Knight automobiles.

Overland Auto Co., had been founded in 1903, in Ohio. After several successful years, it overextended in the year of 1907 financial panic. John North Willys, an Elmira, New York, Overland dealer used all his cash and credit to buy the bankrupt Overland's name, machinery and inventory. Having no money left for a building, he recommenced Overland production in 1908, at Terre Haute, in a circus tent. By 1914, Willys had moved the company to Toledo, changed its name to Willys-Ovefland Co., promoted its Willys Overland models the third most sold car in America and commenced manufacture of the sleeve-salve, Willys-Knight.

Boosted by the Willys-Knight sales from this building, Willy's Overland Co., would, through two decades, sell more sleeve-valve automobiles than all other auto companies in the world, combined. Meanwhile, the popular priced, poppet valve, Willys Overland models were also sold from and serviced in this building,
Willys Building Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones, April 22, 2019
2. Willys Building Marker
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as well as the Willys-Overland Co.'s Whippet, Falcoln-Knight and Stearns-Knight autos.

In 1933, under the pressure of the depression, the Willys-Overland Co. ceased production of all cars except a new, compact model, named just Willys, and moved its St. Louis distributorship to smaller quarters. The Willys-Overland Co. survived to build the Jeep in WWII.
 
Erected by The Horseless Carriage Club of Missouri and Hilliker Corporation.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceRoads & Vehicles. A significant historical year for this entry is 1903.
 
Location. 38° 38.024′ N, 90° 12.741′ W. Marker is in St. Louis, Missouri. Marker is on Locust Street west of North 23rd Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2300 Locust Street, Saint Louis MO 63103, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Peerless Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Mendenhall Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Packard Building (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lambert-Deacon-Hull Printing Company Building (about 700 feet away); 2635 Locust Street (about 800 feet away); Scott Joplin Residence (approx. Ό mile away); Aloe Plaza
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(approx. 0.4 miles away); Union Station (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Louis.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 28, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 182 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 28, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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May. 16, 2022