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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Benton Park in St. Louis, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

DeMenil Mansion

Cherokee-Lemp Historic District

 
 
DeMenil Mansion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 23, 2019
1. DeMenil Mansion Marker
Inscription.  This imposing Greek Revival Mansion began in 1848 with the construction of a four room farmhouse by Henri Chatillon and his then wife Odile Delor Lux Chatillon. They built their home facing Carondelet Avenue, the road that linked St. Louis with Carondelet, the town their grandfather founded. Cousins Henri and Odile were still newlyweds, having married after both were widowed, when they built the house.

Soon after moving to their new home, the publication of Francis Parkman's classic, The Oregon Trail, catapulted Henri Chatillon to national fame. Chatillon had served as wilderness guide to Parkman on his journey of, "observing Indian character," in 1846. Parkman called Chatillon, "my true-hearted friend," and wrote of his wilderness wisdom.

Parkman described Chatillon on their first meeting, "...a fine athletic figure, mounted on a hardy gray Wyandot pony. He wore a white blanket coat, a broad hat of felt, moccasins, and trousers of deer skin, ornamented along the seams with rows of long fringes. His knife was stuck in his belt; his bullet pouch and powderhorn hung at his side, and his rifle lay before him, resting
DeMenil Mansion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 23, 2019
2. DeMenil Mansion Marker
against the high pommel of his saddle, which, like all his equipment, had seen hard service, and was much the worse for the wear."

Chatillon's farmouse that eventually became a mansion — the Chatillon-DeMenil Mansion — was threatened with demolition to make way for Interstate 55. Public outcry saved the landmark and it is now open for guided tours.
 
Erected 1999 by NiNi Harris. (Marker Number B.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Arts, Letters, MusicRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the Missouri, St. Louis, The Cherokee-Lemp History Walk ⚜️ series list.
 
Location. 38° 35.543′ N, 90° 12.974′ W. Marker is in Benton Park in St. Louis, Missouri. Marker is on DeMenil Place north of Cherokee Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3352 DeMenil Place, Saint Louis MO 63118, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. DeMenil Place During The Gay Nineties (a few steps from this marker); Origins (a few steps from this marker); Cherokee Cave (within shouting distance of this marker); The Lemp Brewery (within shouting distance of this marker); The Bungalow
DeMenil Mansion image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 23, 2019
3. DeMenil Mansion
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); This cake commemorates (about 300 feet away); 3319 DeMenil Place (about 300 feet away); 3322 DeMenil Place (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Benton Park.
 
Also see . . .
1. Chatillon-DeMinil House on Wikipedia. (Submitted on October 24, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.)
2. Chatillon-DeMenil Mansion (official website). This is also known locally as the Chatillon-DeMinil House, as it is known to be one of St. Louis' city landmarks. It is usually open for tours by appointment only. One of the largest collections of 1904 St. Louis World's Fair memorabilia is kept here. (Submitted on October 24, 2020, by Jason Voigt of Glen Carbon, Illinois.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 24, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 30, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 142 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 30, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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Jan. 22, 2021