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New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Field Guide of New York Harbor/The Age of Sail

 
 
A Field Guide of New York Harbor/The Age of Sail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, April 12, 2019
1. A Field Guide of New York Harbor/The Age of Sail Marker
Inscription.  
A Field Guide of New York Harbor
New York Harbor extends from its dramatic gateway at The Narrows, a turbulent channel separating Staten Island from Brooklyn, to the Battery at Manhattan’s southern-most tip. One of the world’s great natural harbors, Upper New York Bay has welcomed a steady stream of ships since the 17th Century. During the 19th century, thousands of immigrants marked the end of their passage to America with the sight of the Statue of Liberty and arrival at Ellis Island. According to the logs of explorer Giovanni da Verrazano (sic), the harbor offered “ a very agreeable situation located within two prominent hills, in the midst of which flowed to the sea a very great river…” These are a few of its more prominent landmarks.

The Age of Sail
Only a century ago New York Harbor was crowded with sails. Vessels of every description criss-crossed the waters where two rivers meet, battling tricky tides and currents and seeking favorable winds. Coastal packets carried passengers and freight to nearby destinations in New England and the Mid-Atlantic states. Great schooners came and went, linking
A Field Guide of New York Harbor/The Age of Sail Marker site image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, March 27, 2016
2. A Field Guide of New York Harbor/The Age of Sail Marker site
Robert J. Wagner Jr. Park pavilion
The markers are visible along the viewing platform.
the city to overseas ports. For the first 200 years of its existence, the City’s livelihood depended on the waterfront. All along the lower Manhattan shoreline, ships jostled for position at the busy piers where their cargos were loaded and unloaded. The island at its edges sometimes seemed forested with masts.
 
Location. 40° 42.312′ N, 74° 1.106′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is on Battery Place near Robert F. Wagner Jr. Park, on the right when traveling south. The marker is one of four atop the viewing platform of the Robert J. Wagner Jr. Park pavilion. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10280, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ferries, Tugs and Tall Ships/Along the Western Shore (here, next to this marker); Battery Timeline (here, next to this marker); A Floating Metropolis/Sailings, Sightings and Special Events (here, next to this marker); History of New Pier 1 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island (was about 400 feet away but has been reported missing. ); History of Pier A (about 400 feet away); American Merchant Mariners' Memorial (about 500 feet away); New York Korean War Veterans Memorial (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Categories.
Inset image. Click for full size.
April 12, 2019
3. Inset
"The Age of Sail"
LandmarksWaterways & Vessels
 
"A Field Guide of New York Harbor" image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, 1979
4. "A Field Guide of New York Harbor"
Governors Island
"A Field Guide of New York Harbor" image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, 1994
5. "A Field Guide of New York Harbor"
The Statue of Liberty
"A Field Guide of New York Harbor" image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, 1999
6. "A Field Guide of New York Harbor"
Verrazano-Narrows Bridge
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on May 23, 2019. This page originally submitted on May 22, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 50 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 22, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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