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New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Clement Clarke Moore Park

.489 Acre

 
 
Clement Clarke Moore Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 30, 2018
1. Clement Clarke Moore Park Marker
Inscription.  Scholar and poet Clement Clarke Moore (1779-1863) is the namesake of two New York City parks. The first is a playground in Elmhurst, Queens, known as the Clement Clarke Moore Homestead. The second is this playground, located on a former farmstead purchased by Clement's grandfather, Captain Thomas Clarke, in 1750. A retired British Army officer, Captain Clarke named his property "Chelsea” after London's Royal Chelsea Hospital for veterans. His daughter and son-in-law extended the boundaries to what are now 19th Street, Eighth Avenue, 24th Street, and the Hudson River.

Born in New York City, Clement Clarke Moore spent most of his life on the Chelsea estate. He graduated from Columbia College with a B.A. in 1798, an M.A. in 1801, and an honorary LL.D. in 1829. Moore donated land for the nearby General Theological Seminary, where he taught Oriental and Greek literature from 1823 until his retirement in 1850. Fluent in six languages, he published numerous scholarly works, including a Hebrew lexicon, a biography, and several treatises and addresses.

Moore is best known for having penned the delightful

Clement Clarke Moore Park Marker - wide view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, October 30, 2018
2. Clement Clarke Moore Park Marker - wide view
The marker is visible here mounted to the fence, just to the right of the gate.
children's poem, "A Visit from St. Nicholas."

He composed the poem for his wife Catherine and their children in 1822. A family friend had the poem published anonymously in the Troy Sentinel the following year. The poem soon became a classic, popularly known as "The Night before Christmas.” Moore died in Newport, Rhode Island in 1863.

Ninety-nine years later, the West 400 Block Association 23-22-21 initiated the improvement of neglected property at the corner of Tenth Avenue and 22nd Street. The City of New York acquired the site in 1965 for use as a public park. The playground opened on November 22, 1968 and was named for Clement Clarke Moore by local law in 1969.

Renovations to Clement Clarke Moore Park in 1995 included a new perimeter fence, modular play equipment, safety surfacing, pavements, and transplanted trees. Community members plant and maintain the flower beds, and the West 400 Block Association holds a variety of special events at the park. Every Christmas time, residents gather to read the poem that begins with the familiar words:

Twas the night before Christmas,
when all through the house
Not a creature was stirring,
not even a mouse.

 
Erected by NYC Parks.
 
Location. 40° 44.807′ N, 74° 

Clement Clarke Moore Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, August 28, 2008
3. Clement Clarke Moore Park Marker
The earlier (2000) version of the marker.
0.283′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of 10th Avenue and West 22nd Street, on the right when traveling north on 10th Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New York NY 10011, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Chelsea Historic District and District Extension (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Clement Clarke Moore (about 600 feet away); James N. Wells Mansion - 1835 (about 700 feet away); Cushman Row (about 800 feet away); Chelsea Historic District (approx. 0.2 miles away); George Brinton McClellan, Jr (1865-1940) (approx. mile away); The Muffin House (approx. mile away); Gay Men's Health Crisis (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
Also see . . .
1. Clement Clarke Moore (Poetry Foundation). Brief biography of Moore. Note that the biography attributes "A Visit to St. Nicholas" to a different author. (Submitted on June 7, 2019.) 

2. A Visit from St. Nicholas (Wikipedia). " 'A Visit from St. Nicholas', more commonly known as 'The Night Before Christmas' and "'Twas the Night Before Christmas" from its first line, is a poem first published anonymously in 1823 and later attributed to Clement Clarke Moore, who claimed authorship in 1837...." (Submitted on June 7, 2019.) 
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicParks & Recreational Areas
 
Clement Clarke Moore Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, 2008
4. Clement Clarke Moore Park Marker
The full text of "The Night Before Christmas" was also on site.
 

More. Search the internet for Clement Clarke Moore Park.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 28, 2019. This page originally submitted on June 6, 2019, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 59 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 7, 2019, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.   3, 4. submitted on August 21, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.
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