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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near West Liberty in Champaign County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Mt. Tabor Church / Mt. Tabor Cemetery

 
 
Mt. Tabor Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2008
1. Mt. Tabor Church Marker
Inscription.  
Mt. Tabor Church Side A:

The first Mt. Tabor Church, a log meetinghouse, was erected on this site in 1816. It stood on land originally selected by Griffith and Martha Evans for a graveyard at the death of their daughter circa 1812. Deeds show the Evans family gave two and one half acres of land “for the purpose of erecting a meetinghouse and establishing a burying site.” Camp meetings, religious gatherings popular in frontier Ohio, were held on the hillside west of the meetinghouse. Simon Kenton was converted at a Mt. Tabor camp meeting in 1819. The log meetinghouse burned in 1824 and was replaced with a brick church on the same spot. In 1881, the present brick church was completed and dedicated.

Mt. Tabor Cemetery Side B:

The cemetery at Mt. Tabor basically surrounds the church on three sides. Although the date of death of Griffith and Martha Evans's small daughter varies according to county histories, it indisputably was the first burial in what was to become Mt. Tabor Cemetery. Veterans of the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, World War I, and World War II
Mt. Tabor Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2008
2. Mt. Tabor Cemetery Marker
are interred in the cemetery. Harley Woodard, a local stone carver, furnished many of the gravestones. The cemetery is renowned for its three cast zinc monuments. Far more uncommon than the usual stone monuments, these hollow grave markers, with their distinctive bright gray color, were produced only briefly during the 1880s and 1890s.
 
Erected 2004 by Champaign County Bicentennial Historical Marker Committee, Salem Township Trustees, Descendants of Marshall and Dorothy Connolly Evans Family, and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 10-11.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches & ReligionSettlements & Settlers. In addition, it is included in the Medal of Honor Recipients, and the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection series lists.
 
Location. 40° 13.738′ N, 83° 41.648′ W. Marker is near West Liberty, Ohio, in Champaign County. Marker is on Ohio Route 245 0.2 miles south of Mt. Tabor Road (Ohio Route 507), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cable OH 43009, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Ohio Caverns (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Ludlow Road / The Ludlow Line (approx. 1.2 miles away); The Barn at Mac-A-Cheek Castle
Mt. Tabor Church, Cemetery, and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2008
3. Mt. Tabor Church, Cemetery, and Marker
(approx. 2.3 miles away); Storing the Crops, Livestock and Machinery (approx. 2.3 miles away); Who's in the Dog House? (approx. 2.3 miles away); The Broad and Fertile Acres (approx. 2.3 miles away); Let's Play (approx. 2.3 miles away); A Castle as a Farmhouse (approx. 2.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in West Liberty.
 
Mt. Tabor Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2008
4. Mt. Tabor Cemetery
Mt. Tabor Church and Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2008
5. Mt. Tabor Church and Cemetery
Elisha B. Seaman Medal of Honor Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 9, 2008
6. Elisha B. Seaman Medal of Honor Grave Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 29, 2019. It was originally submitted on November 22, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 3,095 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 22, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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Sep. 30, 2020