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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bowling Green in Warren County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Turpin Building

History

 
 
Turpin Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse
1. Turpin Building Marker
Inscription.  The Turpin Building, constructed in 1872 for Mary Turpin, features one of Bowling Green’s finest facades. Italianate in style, it is faced with stone trademarked by the Warren County White Stone Quarry as “Bowling Green Stone”. The “Bowling Green Stone”, used in many public and private buildings nationwide, such as the Governor’s Mansion in Frankfort, Kentucky and the Customs House in Nashville, Tennessee, won awards at both the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exposition and the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The intricately carved stone on the Turpin Building features floral patterns in the decorative hood molds above the windows, little faces peering at the square from the pilaster capitals and gargoyles.

The building has provided office space for insurance agents, realtors, engineers and a finance company as well as doctors, dentists, a plumbing company and a beauty salon. Pianos, jewelry, sewing machines, shoes and clothes were sold at various time in its history from stores such as the Bazaar Department Store in the 1920s and the Hartig & Benzel Jewelers shop before it moved over to Main Street in
Turpin Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, July 5, 2019
2. Turpin Building Marker
the 1930s. A popular restaurant known as the Lantern Glow Eat Shoppe served meals in the 1940s. It was also the first base for the Commercial Club, the forerunner of Bowling Green’s Chamber of Commerce. The Turpin Family Insurance and Real Estate businesses were located in the building from 1935 to 1958 and one of the founders of the Landmark Association of Bowling Green and Warren County, John C. Perkins, had his real estate office here for many years.

Hearsay
The stone on the façade of the Turpin Building was ordered and delivered for the T. D. Calvert home (later the home of Ogden College) located on the corner of Chestnut Street and Fourteenth Avenue. The building was owned by Mr. Calvert for his residence. Due to financial reverses he was unable to apply the finishing touches and had to sell the stone that had been designed, carved, shipped and was ready to install. If the stone had not been resold for the Turpin Building, it would not be here for us to admire today as the Calvert House / Ogden College was demolished ca. 1950.
 
Location. 36° 59.552′ N, 86° 26.46′ W. Marker is in Bowling Green, Kentucky, in Warren County. Marker is on State Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 914 State Street, Bowling Green KY 42101, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker
Turpin Building image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, July 5, 2019
3. Turpin Building
The Turpin Building is located on the far right.
. Williams Building (a few steps from this marker); Quigley-Younglove Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Barr Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Getty Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Civil War Occupations (within shouting distance of this marker); Princess Theatre (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gerard Hotel (about 300 feet away); The Nahm Building (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bowling Green.
 
Also see . . .  Downtown Heritage Walk. (Submitted on September 8, 2019, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee.)
 
Categories. ArchitectureIndustry & Commerce
 

More. Search the internet for Turpin Building.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 9, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 8, 2019, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 68 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 8, 2019, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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