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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Burlington in Alamance County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Governor Tryon and the Militia

 
 
Governor Tryon and the Militia Marker image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
1. Governor Tryon and the Militia Marker
Viewing east toward marker.
Inscription.  This advantageous position was held by Royal Governor William Tryon and his North Carolina militia during the Battle of Alamance. The men serving Governor Tryon were not British "Redcoats," but the citizen soldiers from the colony of North Carolina. The colonial militia law required that all able-bodied free men between the ages of 16 and 60 serve. This battle position extended across the Hillsborough-Salisbury Road (present-day N.C. Highway 62). Tryon's camp was located about five miles northeast from this point, on the banks of the Great Alamance Creek.

(captions)
English architect John Hawkes constructed Tryon Palace between 1767 and 1770 in New Bern, which served as the colonial capital at the time of the Battle of Alamance. Taxes levied to pay for the building created resentment in the backcountry and energized the Regulator Movement.

Governor Tryon signed and issued this proclamation on June 9, 1771, offering the reward of one hundred pounds and one thousand acres of land to anyone who brought in, dead or alive, outlawed Regulator leaders.

Reenactors demonstrate cannons representative of those
Governor Tryon and the Militia Marker (Governor Tryon's letter of June 9, 1971.) image. Click for full size.
By David Lassman, May 28, 2019
2. Governor Tryon and the Militia Marker (Governor Tryon's letter of June 9, 1971.)
Viewing east towards marker.
used by Gov. Tryon's militia. Records indicate the militia possessed two 3-pounders and six swivel guns.

Claude J. Sauthier, a French surveyor and cartographer, prepared this map shortly after the battle.

This display was made possible by the Alamance County Tourism Development Authority and Convention and Visitors Bureau.
 
Erected by Alamance County Tourism Development Authority and Convention and Visitors Bureau.
 
Location. 36° 0.491′ N, 79° 31.293′ W. Marker is in Burlington, North Carolina, in Alamance County. Marker is at the intersection of State Highway 62 and Clapp Mill Road, on the right when traveling east on State Highway 62. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5803 NC-62 S, Burlington NC 27215, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battle of Alamance (a few steps from this marker); The Regulators' Field (a few steps from this marker); First Battle of the Revolution (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Alamance Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Battle of Alamance (within shouting distance of this marker); Pugh's Rock (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Battle of the Alamance
Governor Tryon and the Militia Marker-French map of Battle of Alamance location image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
3. Governor Tryon and the Militia Marker-French map of Battle of Alamance location
(about 400 feet away); Colonial Column (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burlington.
 
Also see . . .  Alamance Battleground. North Carolina Historic Sites (Submitted on September 18, 2019.) 
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
Governor Tryon and the Militia Marker image. Click for full size.
National Park Service, Thomas Stone National Historic Site, May 28, 2019
4. Governor Tryon and the Militia Marker
Viewing east towards marker.
Governor Tryon and the Militia Marker image. Click for full size.
New York Public Library Digital Collection, circa 1800s
5. Governor Tryon and the Militia Marker
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on September 19, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 18, 2019. This page has been viewed 44 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 18, 2019. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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