Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tuskegee in Macon County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Area Churches That Hosted Important Civil Rights Meetings

 

The Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail

 
Area Churches That Hosted Important Civil Rights Meetings Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, September 20, 2019
1. Area Churches That Hosted Important Civil Rights Meetings Marker
Inscription.  Churches within the African American community played an important role during the civil rights movement. They were places beyond control of white power structure, as well as locations where people could express themselves without reprisal. They represented the freedom civil rights movement participants sought while meeting their congregant's spiritual needs. Churches also served as community bulletin boards. Several area churches hosted important civil rights meetings, like those of the Tuskegee Civic Association. These institutions permitted the use of their auditoriums, grounds, and infrastructure for these meetings without charge. Many important civil rights workers spoke at these churches, including Dr. Martin Luther King, Ralph David Abernathy, and John Lewis. Churches in the area that were instrumental in these meetings included:

Bethel Baptist, Butler Chapel AME Zion, Friendship Baptist,
Greater St. Mark Missionary Baptist, Greenwood Missionary Baptist,
Mount Olive Missionary Baptist, Solomon Chapel AME Zion,
St. Andrew's Episcopal. Washington Chapel AME, Westminster Presbyterian

Please see reverse of this

Reverse side map of churches. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, September 20, 2019
2. Reverse side map of churches.
marker for map locating each of these churches

{Reverse}
[Map of churches]

 
Erected 2019 by City Of Tuskegee, Tuskegee University, Jewish American Society for Historic Preservation. (Marker Number 7.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Historically Black Colleges and Universities, the Jewish American Society for Historic Preservation Markers, and the Tuskegee Civil Rights and Historic Trail, Alabama marker series.
 
Location. 32° 25.564′ N, 85° 42.064′ W. Marker is in Tuskegee, Alabama, in Macon County. Marker is on West Montgomery Road east of Peyton Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: West Montgomery Road, Tuskegee AL 36083, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Birth of Trades Program (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Carver Research Foundation (about 700 feet away); Site of Olivia Davidson Hall (about 700 feet away); Up From Slavery (approx. 0.2 miles away); Thrasher Hall (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Burnt Place (approx. 0.2 miles away); Porter Hall 1883 / Huntington Academic Building 1905 (approx. mile away); Managing the School (approx. mile away).
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches & ReligionCivil Rights

 
View of marker looking west towards Tuskegee University. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, September 20, 2019
3. View of marker looking west towards Tuskegee University.
Closeup of map of churches mentioned on marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, September 20, 2019
4. Closeup of map of churches mentioned on marker.
Dedication program and associated map of trail. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton
5. Dedication program and associated map of trail.
All thirteen new markers were dedicated on September 20th, 2019 at the Tuskegee Municipal Complex.

Please note #1 on the map, Amelia Boynton Robinson marker is actually on Franklin Road, NNW of Tuskegee University, near Boy Scout Circle.

 

More. Search the internet for Area Churches That Hosted Important Civil Rights Meetings.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 3, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 20, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 54 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on September 20, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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