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Windham in Windham County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Windham

 
 
Windham Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 19, 2019
1. Windham Marker
Inscription.  The area which became Windham was a part of Joshúa's Tract, bequeathed to Captain John Mason and other Norwich men in a will dated February 29, 1675, by Mohegan Indian chief Joshua, son of Uncas. The gift included land in the present towns of Windham, Mansfield and Chaplin and parts of Hampton and Scotland. The town name was derived from Wymondham (pronounced "Windham") parish in Norfolkshire, English home of a number of early settlers. By 1692 settlements in Windham were located at the Hither-place (Windham Center), Ponde- place (Mansfield Center), and in the valley of the Willimantic River. On May 12, 1692, the Connecticut General Court incorporated the settlement as the Town of Windham, and the first public town meeting was held on June 12, 1692. Windham completed its meeting house in 1703, the year that Mansfield became a separate town. The Reverend Thomas Clap, president of Yale College 1739 to 1766, was pastor in Windham Center from 1726 until 1739.

During the first half of the eighteenth century Windham developed as the political and economic center of northeastern Connecticut. A court of probate was established in 1719 and
Windham Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 19, 2019
2. Windham Marker
Windham became the county seat of Windham County in 1726.

In the decades before the Revolutionary War Windham experienced the revivalism of the Great Awakening and was the site where the Susquehannah Land Company was formed in 1753, During the Revolutionary era Windham was one of the principal eastern Connecticut communities which provided decisive support for the Patriot cause. Windham's Sons of Liberty were prominent in Connecticut's repudiation of British policies in the 1760’s and 1770’s, and throughout the Revolutionary War Windham supported the American forces with men, powder, and provisions.
 
Erected 1976 by The Town of Windham, the Windham American Revolution Bicentennial Commission, the Windham Historical Society and the Connecticut Historical Commission.
 
Location. 41° 41.96′ N, 72° 9.47′ W. Marker is in Windham, Connecticut, in Windham County. Marker is at the intersection of Windham Center Road and Plains Road, on the left when traveling north on Windham Center Road. Located on the Windham Green. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Windham CT 06280, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Battle of the Frogs (a few steps from this marker); Charter Oak Sapling (a few steps from this marker); Windham World War II Monument (a
Windham Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 19, 2019
3. Windham Marker
few steps from this marker); Windham Free Library (within shouting distance of this marker); Windham Vietnam Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Dr. Chester Hunt Office (within shouting distance of this marker); Windham Center Cemetery (approx. 0.8 miles away); Willimantic Veterans Council Memorial (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Windham.
 
Also see . . .
1. Town of Windham, Connecticut. (Submitted on September 23, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Windham, Connecticut on Wikipedia. (Submitted on September 23, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 

More. Search the internet for Windham.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 6, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 23, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 68 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 23, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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