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Hebron in Tolland County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Hebron

 
 
Hebron Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 19, 2019
1. Hebron Marker
Inscription.  
Hebron
Settlement of the area soon to be named Hebron began in 1704 on land deeded by the Indian sachem Joshua in 1676. The Town was incorporated in 1708. It was nicknamed “Pump Town” from a log cannon, made similar to a wooden water pump, which blew up when fired to celebrate the capture of the fortress of Louisbourg in 1758, a notable English victory in the French and Indian War. Anglican minister Samuel Peters, run out of town in 1774 because of his Tory sympathies, later wrote a history of Connecticut that contained a list of the puritanical "blue laws" attributed to New Haven. His. nephew, John S. Peters, also born here, served as Governor of Connecticut 1831-1833. Judge Sylvester Gilbert, prominent congressman and legislator, opened a law school here in 1810. Famed evangelist Lorenzo Dow lived here 1817- 1820. The Missionary Society of Connecticut oldest in the Nation, was founded here in 1798.
( back )
Though chiefly agricultural since its founding. Hebron had several silk, cotton, and paper mills and an iron furnace in the 19th century. Ams-Sterling automobiles were manufactured here briefly.
Hebron Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 19, 2019
2. Hebron Marker
The Old Town Hall, built in 1838, survived the fire of 1882 that destroyed much of the colonial Hebron center. Included in Hebron town limits are Amstorn (formerly Turnerville), once a thriving mill area, and Gilead, which grew up around the Congregational Church founded there in 1748. The size of the Town was reduced in 1803 when a portion was taken to form a part of Marlborough, and again in 1848 for the incorporation of Andover. Migration westward and the industrial revolution of the 19th century brought a decline in local population that reached its lowest point in the 1930's. Since World War II and especially since 1960 many people who commute to work in the Hartford area have settled in Hebron.
Erected by the Town of Hebron
the Hebron Historical Society
and the Connecticut Historical Commission
1979

 
Erected 1979.
 
Location. 41° 39.506′ N, 72° 21.838′ W. Marker is in Hebron, Connecticut, in Tolland County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (Connecticut Route 66) and Hebron Center Road, on the left when traveling west on Main Street. Located in front of the Hebron Historical Society. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Hebron CT 06248, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Missionary Society of Connecticut (about 500 feet away, measured
Hebron Marker and Hebron Old Town Hall, now the Hebron Historical Society image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, September 19, 2019
3. Hebron Marker and Hebron Old Town Hall, now the Hebron Historical Society
in a direct line); Observation Post 52 (approx. mile away); Columbia (approx. 4.4 miles away); Eleazar Wheelock D.D. (approx. 4.4 miles away); Trooper Russell A. Bagshaw (approx. 4.4 miles away); Columbia Vietnam War Monument (approx. 4.4 miles away); Town of Columbia Honor Roll (approx. 4.4 miles away); Columbia Korean War Monument (approx. 4.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hebron.
 
Also see . . .
1. Town of Hebron. (Submitted on October 5, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
2. Hebron, Connecticut on Wikipedia. (Submitted on October 5, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.)
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 

More. Search the internet for Hebron.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 5, 2019. This page originally submitted on October 5, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 38 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 5, 2019, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.
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