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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Huron in Erie County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Electric Interurban Railways / Lake Shore Electric Railway

 
 
Lake Shore Electric Railway side of marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 6, 2019
1. Lake Shore Electric Railway side of marker
Inscription.  For over three decades, the electric interurban railways played a major part in the economic life of the American Midwest. Their contribution was greatest in Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, and Illinois. The interurban railways were electrically-powered trains speedier than city streetcars that were designed to connect communities together. A quick and cheap alternative to regular railroads, canals or horses, the interurban became a popular mode of travel at the beginning of the 20th century. By 1915, Ohio had 2,780 miles of interurban track.

Lake Shore Electric Railway (LSE) operated routes from Cleveland to Detroit via Avon Lake, Lorain, Vermillion, Huron, Sandusky and Toledo. For many years, Huron residents used the LSE Railway to travel to neighboring towns and students relied on the trolley for school transportation. The LSE carried hundreds of tourists to lakeshore communities and Cedar Point. In addition to passengers, the LSE transported industrial and package freight, as well as farm produce and fish. The increased popularity of the automobile combined with the Great Depression eventually led to the demise of the
Electric Interurban Railways side of marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 6, 2019
2. Electric Interurban Railways side of marker
electric railway.
 
Erected 2015 by Huron Historical Society, Huron Parks Foundation, and The Ohio History Connection. (Marker Number 28-22.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 41° 23.779′ N, 82° 33.993′ W. Marker is in Huron, Ohio, in Erie County. Marker is at the intersection of South Jim Campbell Boulevard and North Jim Campbell Boulevard, on the left when traveling west on South Jim Campbell Boulevard. It is at the start of the Lake Short Electric Trail across from the Huron High School stadium. It can be seen from U.S. 6 Westbound, but there is no access from U.S. 6. Instead turn on Center Street and turn left on South Jim Campbell Boulevard which parallels U.S. 6. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Huron OH 44839, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Huron’s First Inhabitants (approx. 0.3 miles away); World War II (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Huron Playhouse (approx. 0.4 miles away); Christ Episcopal Church (approx. 0.6 miles away); Huron / Erie County (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Wright House and the Underground Railroad/Old Main Street (approx.
Electric Interurban Railways / Lake Shore Electric Railway Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 6, 2019
3. Electric Interurban Railways / Lake Shore Electric Railway Marker
0.6 miles away); John Baptiste Flemmond (approx. 0.8 miles away); The Legacy of the Huron Docks (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Huron.
 
More about this marker. A photograph of an “interurban car crossing the bridge at Huron, Ohio” dated “about 1910” is reproduced on the marker. Click on Photo 2 to enlarge the image so you can inspect it.
 
Also see . . .  The Interurban Railroad and the Lake Shore Electric Railway. Excerpt:
Through service on the Lake Short Electric Railway from Cleveland to Toledo, passing through Huron, opened on December 29, 1901. The Lake Shore Electric has been called the greatest electric interurban line in the nation. It became known for its fast service between Cleveland and Toledo, and its big, luxurious cars. The Lake Shore was a major transportation link in northern Ohio and directly contributed to the growth of many communities along its route.
(Submitted on October 24, 2019.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. The Lake Shore Electric Railway Company
At the beginning of the 20th century, the Lake Shore Electric operated fast passenger service between Cleveland and Toledo, stopping at Huron and, when Old Homestead-on-the-Lake was developed in the late 1920s, also there. “Fast” was relative to the era, compared with steamship service and primitive automobiles running on narrow, rutted and muddy roads. The Lake Shore Electric
Lake Shore Electric Right of Way image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, August 6, 2019
4. Lake Shore Electric Right of Way
Looking west from the marker.
was faster than the steam-powered railroads that paralleled its route. “Fast” was averaging a little under 30 miles an hour, including station stops. The 49 mile ride from Cleveland was about an hour and 45 minutes. From Toledo the 71 mile ride was two and a half hours.

Eight trains a day in each direction made the run between Cleveland and Toledo, an additional eight trains in each direction made shorter runs. Huron passengers could catch any of those 16 westbound trains for a 30 minute ride to Sandusky for a fancy department store lunch or restaurant dinner, and the train was the perfect way to get to Cedar Point amusement park, just one stop west. The last train back left Sandusky at 9:36 p.m. and Cedar Point a few minutes later.

By 1938 the automobile had won and the Lake Shore Electric ceased service to Huron before the 1938 summer season began.
    — Submitted October 24, 2019, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.

 
Categories. Railroads & Streetcars
 

More. Search the internet for Electric Interurban Railways / Lake Shore Electric Railway.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 25, 2019. This page originally submitted on October 24, 2019, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio. This page has been viewed 34 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 24, 2019, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.   3, 4. submitted on October 25, 2019, by J. J. Prats of Powell, Ohio.
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