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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Fort Benton in Chouteau County, Montana — The American West (Mountains)
 

Whoop-up Trail

 
 
Whoop-up Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 14, 2019
1. Whoop-up Trail Marker
Inscription.  North from Fort Benton ran another wagon road to Canada, the famous Whoop-up Trail. Whiskey traders carried supplies north and brought buffalo robes south to Fort Benton for transport down river by steamboat. Later the Whoop-up Trail supplied the Northwest Mounted Police at Fort Macleod. From 1869 to 1883 most supplies came up river by boat, then by wagon to Canadian settlement as far north as Calgary and Edmonton. The trail ran up the Teton, by the Knees, via Baking Powder Flats to Shelby, then across the border and the Milk River to Fort Macleod and Lethbridge.
 
Location. 47° 48.892′ N, 110° 42.569′ W. Marker is near Fort Benton, Montana, in Chouteau County. Marker is on U.S. 87 near County Road 386, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Benton MT 59442, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fur Trade Posts (here, next to this marker); Lewis and Clark Trail (here, next to this marker); Chouteau County (here, next to this marker); Steamboat Navigation (here, next to this marker);
Missouri River Overlook Kiosk image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 14, 2019
2. Missouri River Overlook Kiosk
Fort Benton (here, next to this marker); Mullan Road (here, next to this marker); St. Paul's Episcopal Church (approx. 1.7 miles away); a different marker also named St. Paul's Episcopal Church (approx. 1.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Benton.
 
Also see . . .
1. Whoop Up: The Trail That Made Fort Benton Mercantile Owners Rich -- Signature Montana Magazine. In Canada, until 1869, the Hudson Bay Company had complete control of all of western Canada, what was known then as the Northwest Territories. When the Canadian government convinced the Crown of their desire to take control of the Northwest Territories’ land mass, the Hudson Bay Company, seeing minimal beaver pelt trade in the southern part of Western Canada, pulled out and left it lawless. The area was wide open to any kind of trade, including whiskey trade, until Canada could organize a system for governing. (Submitted on October 31, 2019, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 

2. Fort Whoop-up -- The Canadian Encyclopedia. Initially called Fort Hamilton, it was soon called Fort Whoop-up. It burned down after one trading season, and construction
Wagons on the Whoop-up Trail image. Click for full size.
By Signature Montana Magazine
3. Wagons on the Whoop-up Trail
of a second and larger fort began in 1870. This was the most formidable and notorious of the several American whisky posts located in southern Alberta, and the entire area became known as "Whoop-Up country."
(Submitted on October 31, 2019, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.) 
 
Categories. Roads & Vehicles
 
Fort Whoop-up image. Click for full size.
By Unknown
4. Fort Whoop-up
 

More. Search the internet for Whoop-up Trail.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 31, 2019. This page originally submitted on October 31, 2019, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California. This page has been viewed 42 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 31, 2019, by Barry Swackhamer of Brentwood, California.
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