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Kent in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battery Kemble Park

Defense of Washington

 
 
Defense of Washington Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 28, 2007
1. Defense of Washington Marker
Inscription.  Built in the autumn of 1861 and enlarged in 1862, the battery was named for Gouveneur Kemble of Cold Spring, NY, a former superintendent of the West Point Foundry. The battery, which consisted of two 100-pound Parrott guns, was designed to sweep the Virginia heights across the Potomac River of any Confederate threats to Chain Bridge.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Defenses of Washington marker series.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 38° 55.702′ N, 77° 5.725′ W. Marker was in Kent, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker was on Chain Bridge Road Northwest north of MacArthur Boulevard Northwest, on the right when traveling north. Located at the Battery Kemble Park entrance. Touch for map. Marker was at or near this postal address: 2832 Chain Bridge Road Northwest, Washington DC 20016, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Jeju Jeong-nang (approx. 0.6 miles away); Site of the American University Address
Entrance to Battery Kemble Park image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 28, 2007
2. Entrance to Battery Kemble Park
(approx. 0.6 miles away); Birthplace of the Army Chemical Corps (approx. 0.6 miles away); School of International Service (approx. 0.7 miles away); Mary Eliza Graydon (approx. 0.7 miles away); Jeju Dolhareubang (approx. 0.7 miles away); Korean Cherry Trees (approx. 0.7 miles away); Abner Cloud House (approx. 0.7 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. Battery Kemble. The park is a unit of the Rock Creek National Park. (Submitted on December 9, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Wikipedia entry for Gouverneur Kemble. (Submitted on April 10, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Battery Kemble and Associated Fortifications
From "Mr. Lincoln's Forts: A Guide to the Civil War Defenses of Washington," by Benjamin Franklin Cooling III and Walton H. Owen II:

Wartime garrisons were made up of the 2nd U.S. Artillery, 9th New York Heavy Artillery, and Company A, 1st New Hampshire Heavy Artillery.

Battery Kemble was one in a chain of fortifications directly protecting the DC side of the Chain Bridge. These were Battery Cameron (two 100-pdr Parrott rifles), Battery
Battery Kemble Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By A. Taylor, November 3, 2019
3. Battery Kemble Park Marker
Man standing where marker used to be. It's not there anymore.
Parrott (two 100-pdr Parrott rifles), Battery Kemble, Battery Martin Scott (one 8-inch Seacoast howitzer, two 32-pdr cannon, later changed to two 6-pdr cannon and two 12-pdr howitzers), and Battery Vermont (three 32-pdr seacoast cannon).
    — Submitted December 9, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Section of the Battery Kemble Earthworks image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 28, 2007
4. Section of the Battery Kemble Earthworks
Section of the Battery Kemble Interior image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 28, 2007
5. Section of the Battery Kemble Interior
 

More. Search the internet for Battery Kemble Park.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 5, 2019. This page originally submitted on December 9, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 4,181 times since then and 13 times this year. Last updated on November 4, 2019, by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 9, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on November 4, 2019, by A. Taylor of Laurel, Maryland.   4, 5. submitted on December 9, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • Devry Becker Jones was the editor who published this page.
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