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Dover Air Force Base in Kent County, Delaware — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

C-7A

Caribou

 

S/N 63-9760

 
C-7A Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, November 11, 2019
1. C-7A Marker
Inscription.  The Canadian DHC-4 Caribou, a dedicated short takeoff and landing (STOL) utility transport, first flew in 1958. The aircraft was designed to combine the STOL performance of the Canadian Otter aircraft with the load-carrying capability of the DC-3.

The U.S. Army was so improved by the rugged Caribou that it ordered a total of 159, and it became the army's standard STOL utility transport.

In 1967, the U.S. Army's CV-2s were transferred to the U.S. Air Force and were redesignated C-7s. In the Vietnam War, the flexible Caribou proved its worth ferrying troops and freight to places no other conventional aircraft could reach.

After being transferred from the army, the museum's Caribou was assigned to the 483rd Troop Carrier Wing in Vietnam from 1967 to 1971. In 1972, it was transferred to the Alabama Air National Guard. In 1983, it was again transferred to the U.S. Army to be a jump aircraft for the Golden Knights, the army parachute team. The aircraft was retired to the AMC Museum in 1991.

Specifications
Manufacturer: de Havilland Canada
Type: Short takeoff
C-7A Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, November 11, 2019
2. C-7A Marker
and landing utility transport
Powerplant: Two 1,500-hp Pratt & Whitney R-2000-7M2 air-cooled radial piston engines
Maximum Speed: 215 mph
Range: 1,380 mi. with max payload
Service Ceiling: 24,800 ft
Max Takeoff Weight: 28,500 lb
Crew: Pilot, co-pilot, and loadmaster
Payload: 8,740 lb of cargo, 32 passengers, 26 paratroopers, or 20 litter patients
Dimensions:
Wing Span: 95 ft 7 in
Length: 72 ft 7 in
Height: 31 ft 10 in

[Captions:]
Above: In Vietnam, Caribous flew supplies to forward airstrips where helicopters then took over. Eight were lost in combat.

A high-mounted flight compartment gives a good view on takeoff and landing. The Caribou's primary mission is providing rapid mobility of troops, equipment, and supplies in a forward battle area.

Power comes from two wing-mounted Pratt & Whitney R-2000-7M2 Double Wasp air-cooled, 14-cylinder, two-row radial engines, each driving a Hamilton Standard three-blade airscrew propeller.

The cabin space accommodates 32 troops sitting on side folding seats, or 20 litter patients, four sitting casualties, and four medical attendants.

The cabin floor is stressed to support evenly distributed loads of 2,150 pounds per square yard.

A
Dedication bench nearby image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, November 11, 2019
3. Dedication bench nearby
hinging, electrically powered tail ramp is also used as the principal entrance door for troops and freight. Light-wheeled vehicles such as jeeps can easily enter the cabin by driving up the ramp.

 
Location. 39° 7.095′ N, 75° 27.439′ W. Marker is in Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, in Kent County. Marker can be reached from Heritage Road 0.7 miles west of Bayside Drive (Delaware Route 9), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1301 Heritage Road, Dover AFB DE 19902, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. C-133B (within shouting distance of this marker); A-26C (within shouting distance of this marker); C-54M (within shouting distance of this marker); C-123K (within shouting distance of this marker); F-101B (within shouting distance of this marker); C-131D (within shouting distance of this marker); UH-1H (within shouting distance of this marker); C-130E (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dover Air Force Base.
 
Categories. Air & SpaceScience & MedicineWar, Vietnam
 

More. Search the internet for C-7A.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 13, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 13, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 37 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 13, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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