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Crystal Falls in Iron County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Finnish Pioneers

 
 
Finnish Pioneers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 18, 2011
1. Finnish Pioneers Marker
Inscription.  
In Memoriam
to the Finnish Pioneers

who adopted this land as their own,
settled here in 1850 and after, and
became a constructive force in the
economic and social life of our
country, in its lumbering, mining,
and farming.

Finnish Historical Society of Hiawathaland
Muisto Suomen Heimolle

 
Erected by Finnish Historical Society of Hiawathaland.
 
Location. 46° 5.798′ N, 88° 20.107′ W. Marker is in Crystal Falls, Michigan, in Iron County. Marker is on South 6th Street just south of Superior Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Marker is located on the Iron County Courthouse grounds, near the southeast corner of the courthouse. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2 South 6th Street, Crystal Falls MI 49920, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Iron County Courthouse (a few steps from this marker); Iron County (a few steps from this marker); July 4th 1661 (approx. 5.4 miles
Finnish Pioneers Marker • <i>wide view<br>(Iron County Courthouse in background)</i> image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 18, 2011
2. Finnish Pioneers Marker • wide view
(Iron County Courthouse in background)
away); Indian Village (approx. 9.1 miles away); Pentoga Park (approx. 9.1 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. The Great Finnish Emigration. Between 1870 and 1929 an estimated 350,000 Finnish immigrants arrived in the United States, many of them settling in an area that would be come to known as the “Sauna Belt,” a region of especially high population density of Finnish Americans encompassing the northern counties of Wisconsin, the northwestern counties of Minnesota, and the central and northern counties of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The primary reason Finnish immigrants chose to immigrate to the US was for the job opportunities available in the mines prevalent in the Great Lakes area. Many of these Finnish immigrants were young, uneducated, unskilled men who had grown up on small rural farms but did not own land themselves. (Submitted on November 28, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Finnish Americans (Wikipedia). In the 1870s, there were only 3,000 migrants from Finland, but this figure was rapidly growing. New migrants often sent letters home, describing their life in the New World, and this encouraged more and more people to leave and try their luck in America. Rumors began of the acres of land that could be cleared into vast productive fields and the
Iron County Courthouse<br>(marker visible bottom left corner)</i> image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 18, 2011
3. Iron County Courthouse
(marker visible bottom left corner)
opportunity to earn "a barrel of American dollars" in mines, factories, and railroads. (Submitted on November 28, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Finnish American Historical Society of Hiawathaland. Finns of Iron County, Michigan (Submitted on November 28, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 

More. Search the internet for Finnish Pioneers.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 28, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 27, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 51 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 28, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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