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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Montrose in Los Angeles County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

The Great Flood of 1934

 
 
The Great Flood of 1934 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, May 30, 2019
1. The Great Flood of 1934 Marker
Inscription.  On this site American Legion Post 288 once stood. The great flood swept through its walls shortly after midnight on New Year’s Day, taking with it 12 local residents. Most had taken refuge inside from the torrential rain and two were dedicated Red Cross volunteers, Myrtle Adams and Vera De Woody Kahn. Many others from the Crescenta Valley lost their lives to the massive debris flows. Injuries were numerous and property loss overwhelming. Thanks to the sacrifice of local taxpayers and the efforts of county, state and federal agencies, a network of debris basins and flood channels was completed in 1938, preventing a repetition of the disaster. This plaque has been created in memory of those who perished.
 
Erected 2004 by Historical Society of the Crescenta Valley; CV Town Council; and Michael D. Antonivich, Supervisor, Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.
 
Location. 34° 12.839′ N, 118° 14.104′ W. Marker is in Montrose, California, in Los Angeles County. Marker is at the intersection of Rosemont Avenue and Fairway Avenue
Marker and Flood Control Channel image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, May 30, 2019
2. Marker and Flood Control Channel
, on the right when traveling north on Rosemont Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2537 Fairway Avenue, Montrose CA 91020, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Crescenta-Cañada Valley (approx. 0.7 miles away); Crescenta Valley Park (approx. 1½ miles away); Descanso Gardens (approx. 1½ miles away); San Rafael Rancho (approx. 2.4 miles away); Tuna Canyon Detention Station (approx. 2½ miles away); Doctors House (approx. 3.2 miles away); Miss American Green Cross (approx. 3.2 miles away); El Miradero (approx. 3.2 miles away).
 
Regarding The Great Flood of 1934. The building was moved one block west to 4011 La Crescenta Avenue, and is still American Legion Post 288.
 
Categories. DisastersFraternal or Sororal Organizations
 
The marker is at the fence. image. Click for full size.
By Craig Baker, May 30, 2019
3. The marker is at the fence.
<i>American Legion Hall damaged by flood and mudslide, La Crescenta-Montrose, 1934</i> image. Click for full size.
Los Angeles Times (courtesy of the Charles E. Young Research Library, UCLA), 1934
4. American Legion Hall damaged by flood and mudslide, La Crescenta-Montrose, 1934
"In November 1933, wildfires raged through the San Gabriel Mountains above the Crescenta Valley. In late December, a series of storms dropped 12 inches of rain. On New Year's Eve, heavy rains led to sporadic flooding. Around midnight, mountain hillsides collapsed sending millions of tons of mud into the Crescenta Valley neighborhoods below. More than 400 homes were destroyed in La Cañada, La Crescenta, Montrose and Tujunga. Scores of people were killed, and hundreds were left homeless....View of the American Legion Hall, damaged by flood and mudslide....The mudslide crashed into the back of the building and filled it with mud and rocks. The building was located at the intersection of Fairway Ave. and Rosemont Ave."
 

More. Search the internet for The Great Flood of 1934.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 2, 2019. This page originally submitted on June 1, 2019, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. This page has been viewed 65 times since then and 5 times this year. Last updated on November 29, 2019, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 1, 2019, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California.   4. submitted on June 1, 2019. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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