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Nokesville in Prince William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Narrow Escape

Engagement at Kettle Run

 

Second Manassas Campaign

 
A Narrow Escape Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, November 30, 2019
1. A Narrow Escape Marker
Inscription.  In August 1862, Confederate Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson led his command around Union Gen. John Pope's right flank to cut Federal communication lines and pave the way for the rest of Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia to follow from the Rappahannock River. At sunset on August 26, Jackson occupied Bristoe Station on the Orange & Alexandria (O&A) Railroad just east of here to intercept and destroy Union supply trains headed to Alexandria. Jackson ordered Gen. Richard S. Ewell to destroy the O&A bridge over Kettle Run to slow Pope's advance from the south.

Pope ordered Capt. Harman Bliss and the 72nd New York Infantry (3rd Excelsior) to board a train at Warrenton Junction and head toward Bristoe Station. Bliss stopped the train short of Kettle Run well before dawn the next morning and marched across to see flaming wreckage at the station. He withdrew across the run after some skirmishing and prepared to make a stand to save the bridge. When he saw a large force of Confederate advancing, however, he boarded his men as two shots from an artillery piece ricocheted near the locomotive and ordered the engineer to withdraw.
A Narrow Escape Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, November 30, 2019
2. A Narrow Escape Marker
Just then, Capt. G. Campbell Brown, Ewell's stepson and staff member, spurred his horse in pursuit. Brown fired three errant shots as Bliss and his men made good their escape to Warrenton Junction, where they arrived before 5 A.M. Ewell destroyed the bridge, which delayed Union troops and supplies and contributed to Pope's defeat at the Second Battle of Manassas.

"I got alongside the Engine and order the Driver to halt—but he only went the faster. I fired at him three shots ... but had the mortification to see him get off unhurt."
— Capt. G. Campbell Brown

 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 42.457′ N, 77° 33.893′ W. Marker is in Nokesville, Virginia, in Prince William County. Marker is at the intersection of Aden Road (Virginia Route 646) and Marsteller Drive, on the right when traveling south on Aden Road. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 11336 Aden Road, Nokesville VA 20181, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Early & Gordon at Bristoe Station (here, next to this marker); Battle of Kettle Run (was approx. 0.6 miles away but has been reported missing.
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); Bristoe Station (approx. 1 miles away); a different marker also named Bristoe Station (approx. 1 miles away); a different marker also named Bristoe Station (approx. 1 miles away); a different marker also named Bristoe Station (approx. 1 miles away); a different marker also named Bristoe Station (approx. 1.6 miles away); a different marker also named Bristoe Station (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Nokesville.
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsRailroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 

More. Search the internet for A Narrow Escape.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 1, 2019. This page originally submitted on December 1, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 42 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 1, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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