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San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Native Daughters of the Golden West Home

 
 
Native Daughters of the Golden West Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By James King, December 3, 2019
1. Native Daughters of the Golden West Home Marker
Inscription.  The Order of the Native Daughters of the Golden West was founded on September 25, 1886. In 1899, a Home was established providing our members with "...rest, serenity and an abiding place of affection..."

This structure is our fourth Home in San Francisco. It was inspired by Dr. Mariana Bertola, designed by architect Julia Morgan, built by contractors John Barrett and Harold Hilp, and formally dedicated on January 19, 1929.

Our Home has served as a meeting place, assembly hall, hospital and nursing home, and provided board and lodging for Native Daughters from throughout our Golden State. It continues to offer our members and their guests gracious accommodations while housing our Order's museum, reference library and corporate offices.

Dedicated October 6, 2012
By the Native Daughters of the Golden West
Dr. Linda M. Galassi, Grand President

 
Erected 2012 by Native Daughters of the Golden West.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location.
Native Daughters in front of the ND's Home image. Click for full size.
By Julia R. Hull
2. Native Daughters in front of the ND's Home
The marker is visible on the wall behind them
37° 46.565′ N, 122° 26.498′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker is on Baker Street near Fulton Street, on the left when traveling north. The Native Daughters' Home is the second structure from the southwest corner of Baker and Fulton. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 555 Baker Street, San Francisco CA 94117, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Westerfield House (approx. 0.3 miles away); 1545 Divisadero (approx. 0.6 miles away); Former Site of Laurel Hill Cemetery (was approx. 0.8 miles away but has been reported missing. ); Swedish American Hall (approx. 0.9 miles away); The San Francisco Columbarium (approx. 0.9 miles away); Mint Hill (approx. 0.9 miles away); A New Ballgame (approx. 0.9 miles away); King of the Road! (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Francisco.
 
More about this marker. The marker is mounted on the front wall, facing the street, to the left of the entrance to the building.
 
Also see . . .
1. Ahead of Her Time: California Icon Julia Morgan. "...architect Julia Morgan -- preferred to remain out of the spotlight. By the time she died in 1957, she had designed an estimated 700 buildings, mostly in California, where she was the first woman in the state to be licensed as an architect. Morgan’s groundbreaking career spanned a major earthquake, the Great Depression, and two world wars. “Drive is what she had, and the most spectacular
Native Daughters of the Golden West Home image. Click for full size.
By Julia R. Hull
3. Native Daughters of the Golden West Home
will,” says Victoria Kastner, Hearst Castle’s official historian. “She was indomitable.” "
(Submitted on December 5, 2019, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 

2. Jo Anne Davis: Who are the Native Daughters of the Golden West?. "Native Daughters of the Golden West was instituted on Sept. 11, 1886 in the historic mining town of Jackson, Amador County, by a young woman named Miss Lilly O. Reichling (later Mrs. Dyer). She loved California and at the age of 20 years old she began an organization for all California-born women of good moral character and who also shared her love of California. Love of California is evident in the Order’s unceasing efforts to promote the study of her romantic history and reverence for the memory of the sturdy Pioneer fathers and mothers, the founders of our great state." (Submitted on December 5, 2019, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 

3. Julia Morgan: Iconic architect. "Julia Morgan, one barrier after another fell to the wayside. She was the only woman to graduate with a civil engineering degree from Berkeley in 1894. She was the first woman admitted to the prestigious architecture program at École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. And she was the first licensed female architect in California, working for John Galen Howard before launching her own firm in 1904. Look around the state —
Inside the Native Daughters of the Golden West Home image. Click for full size.
By Julia R. Hull
4. Inside the Native Daughters of the Golden West Home
The living room.
you’ll see Morgan’s designs in more than 700 projects in a wide range of historic styles, including Hearst Castle, the Berkeley Playhouse (formerly St. John’s Presbyterian Church), Asilomar Conference Center and numerous campus buildings at UC Berkeley and Mills College."
(Submitted on December 5, 2019, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 

4. Native Daughters of the Golden West Home. " Julia Morgan, the famed architect of Hearst Castle, drew the plans for our present facility. Formally dedicated in January 1929, the Home currently is maintained for the “aid and comfort of NDGW members”. Located in the center of San Francisco, the NDGW Home is a four-story, reinforced concrete building with a Museum, Meeting Facilities, Public Reference Library (Pioneer Roster), and guest rooms for Native Daughters of the Golden West members and their guests to visit the city of San Francisco." (Submitted on December 5, 2019, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 

5. Meet The Native Daughters Of The Golden West. "Ever wandered by the stately building at 555 Baker Street at Fulton and wondered what it was? Common guesses are a convent, an embassy or a church. Curious, we decided to take a deeper look." (Submitted on December 5, 2019, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 
 
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More. Search the internet for Native Daughters of the Golden West Home.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 9, 2020. This page originally submitted on December 5, 2019, by James King of San Miguel, California. This page has been viewed 257 times since then and 50 times this year. Last updated on December 5, 2019, by James King of San Miguel, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 5, 2019, by James King of San Miguel, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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