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Galveston in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Wesley Tabernacle United Methodist Church

 
 
Wesley Tabernacle United Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, December 14, 2019
1. Wesley Tabernacle United Methodist Church Marker
Inscription.  

The African American Methodist community in Galveston dates to 1848, when Gail Borden deeded land on Broadway for a salve church. Following the Civil War, the congregation changed its affiliation from Methodist Episcopal Church, South, to the African Methodist Episcopal denomination. The church became known in 1867 as Reedy Chapel A.M.E., forerunner of A.M.E. churches throughout Texas. St. Paul M.E. Church split from Reedy Chapel, and in 1868 the St. Paul group divided, with one group buying property on Broadway and 38th Streets and becoming Wesley Tabernacle Church.

The new congregation changed locations and sanctuaries, starting with a one-room house later moved to a new site at Avenue I (Sealy) and 28th in 1870. The church added buildings later destroyed in an 1879 fire. A new wood frame sanctuary, severely damaged in the 1900 hurricane, was rebuilt by John Tankersley and an African American carpentry crew. The façade changed again in 1924 when the Galveston grade raising reached this neighborhood. Houston architectural firm Stowe and Stowe and builder Henry H. Lasden built a new red brick façade with white stone detailing.
Wesley Tabernacle United Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By Jim Evans, December 14, 2019
2. Wesley Tabernacle United Methodist Church
The marker is on the far right in this view, blocked by the entrance steps.
The building features a prominent corner tower, bracketed tower cap and twin bracketed porch canopies, mixing elements of Gothic Revival and Craftsman style architecture. Interior features include a unique hand-hewn structural truss system intact from renovations following the 1900 storm. Pews and altar furniture date from the 1881 sanctuary. Wesley Tabernacle United Methodist Church has long been involved in social progress for the African American community it serves. Members have promoted civil rights for many years, including organization of the first anti-lynching society in Texas in 1914.

Recorded Texas Historic Landmark - 2007
Marker is property of the state of Texas

 
Erected 2007 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13986.)
 
Location. 29° 17.955′ N, 94° 47.875′ W. Marker is in Galveston, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker is at the intersection of 28th Street and Sealy Avenue, on the right when traveling north on 28th Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 902 28th Street, Houston TX 77058, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Moody Home (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Original Oleander Planting in Galveston (approx. ¼ mile away); Open Gates (was
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approx. ¼ mile away but has been reported missing. ); Galveston Office of the National Weather Service (approx. ¼ mile away); Jack Johnson (approx. ¼ mile away); Ashton Villa, 1859 (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Eugenia & George Sealy Pavilion (approx. 0.3 miles away); Sweeney-Royston House (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Galveston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wesley Tabernacle Facebook Page. (Submitted on December 17, 2019, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
2. African American history in Galveston. (Submitted on December 17, 2019, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas.)
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches & Religion
 

More. Search the internet for Wesley Tabernacle United Methodist Church.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 17, 2019. This page originally submitted on December 16, 2019, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. This page has been viewed 38 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 16, 2019, by Jim Evans of Houston, Texas. • J. Makali Bruton was the editor who published this page.
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