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Jacksonville in Duval County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Life Under Siege

Jacksonville on the Edge of the Civil War

 

— Camp Milton Historic Preserve —

 
Life Under Siege Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, November 11, 2019
1. Life Under Siege Marker
Inscription.  
The Civil War In Jacksonville

Between 1861 and 1864, a long and bitter civil war divided our nation. Many of the most publicized events of this tragic conflict occurred in Virginia, South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Mississippi. Because of this, one might assume that war activities in Jacksonville were less significant. In reality Jacksonville was invaded and abandoned by Union forces four times during the Civil War, more than any other Southern city.

The Union first invaded Jacksonville in March of 1862. Confederate General Robert E. Lee ordered the City abandoned by Southern troops. Upon departure, the Confederate soldiers burned eight sawmills and millions of board feet of lumber. Departing, the troops also destroyed a foundry, a boat, and scuttled the prized schooner “America,” which won the America’s Cup in 1851. Many local businessman who were Union sympathizers remained in the city.

Federal troops departed downtown Jacksonville shortly after the first invasion. They returned for the second invasion on October 10, 1862. This time the city was evacuated without fire and
Life Under Siege Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, November 11, 2019
2. Life Under Siege Marker
destruction. On March 10, 1863, the Union Army returned for the third invasion and introduced the use of African American troops for the first time in Florida. The Union soon departed, but federal gunboats remained on the St. Johns River for the remainder of the war. On February 7, 1864, the Union invaded Jacksonville for the fourth and final time. President Abraham Lincoln had news that some Floridians were attempting to rejoin the union and sent the Union Army to assist.

By July, 1864, the Union guarded downtown Jacksonville on three sides. Fortifications included lunettes, rifle pits, redoubts and eight batteries , complete with artillery.
 
Location. 30° 20.068′ N, 81° 52.16′ W. Marker is in Jacksonville, Florida, in Duval County. Marker can be reached from Halsema Road North 0.4 miles north of Old Plank Road, on the right when traveling north. Located within the Camp Milton Historic Preserve. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1225 Halsema Rd N, Jacksonville FL 32220, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Harriet B. Stowe Live Oak (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Third Union Invasion (about 500 feet away); The Tension Of War (about 700 feet away); Jefferson Davis Live Oak (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Harvey Farm
Photo Insert Left - Union encampment in Jacksonville image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, November 11, 2019
3. Photo Insert Left - Union encampment in Jacksonville
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Fort Fisher Live Oak (approx. 0.2 miles away); Stonewall Jackson Prayer Oak (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lincoln’s Tomb White Oak (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Jacksonville.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Center Photo - Union Soldiers In Jacksonville image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, November 11, 2019
4. Center Photo - Union Soldiers In Jacksonville
Civil War Fortifications image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, November 11, 2019
5. Civil War Fortifications
Camp Milton Historic Preserve Sign image. Click for full size.
By Brandon D Cross, November 11, 2019
6. Camp Milton Historic Preserve Sign
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on December 21, 2019. This page originally submitted on December 16, 2019, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. This page has been viewed 73 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on December 16, 2019, by Brandon D Cross of Flagler Beach, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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