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Niles in Alameda County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Completion of the Transcontinental Railroad

Niles, California

 
 
Completion of the Transcontinental Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 6, 2009
1. Completion of the Transcontinental Railroad Marker
Inscription.  “May God continue the unity of our country as this railroad unites the two great oceans of the world.” The gold spike ceremony at Promontory, Utah in May of 1869 united the tracks of the Central Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads. However the rails did not span the United States from ocean to ocean until some months later. In September the final link between San Francisco and Sacramento was completed near the Flour Mill of Jesus Vallejo, a short distance east of this location.
 
Erected 1979 by Joaquin Murrieta Chapter No.13 E Clampus Vitus and the Niles Merchants Association, August 4, 1979.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus, and the Transcontinental Railroad marker series.
 
Location. 37° 34.596′ N, 121° 58.597′ W. Marker is in Niles, California, in Alameda County. Marker can be reached from Niles Boulevard near J Street. Marker is located at the eastern end of the parking lot next to the Niles Merchants Association Railroad Car Office. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 37701 Niles Boulevard, Fremont CA 94536, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other
Completion of the Transcontinental Railroad Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 6, 2009
2. Completion of the Transcontinental Railroad Marker
markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. “The Bankers Building” (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Site of First Post Office (about 400 feet away); Vallejo Flour Mill (about 800 feet away); Essanay Studio Site (approx. 0.2 miles away); Essanay Film Studio (approx. ¼ mile away); Pioneer Schoolhouse & Chapel (approx. 1.1 miles away); Mormon Pioneers / Mormon Pioneer Adobes (approx. 1.2 miles away); The Chadbourne Carriage House (approx. 2.1 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  An 1870 Map of the Railroad from Sacramento to San Francisco. Make note that the railroad line went around the San Francisco Bay and then made its way north along the San Francisco Peninsula. (Submitted on November 13, 2009.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. First railroad between Sacramento and San Francisco Bay
Was the final link between San Francisco and Sacramento, as stated on the plaque, completed September 1869 near Vallejo Mills? Well, not really.

Here's what happened. In 1866, Western Pacific built 20 miles of railroad northward from San Jose, turning eastward at Vallejo Mills into Alameda Cañon to near milepost 33, where construction was stopped for financial reasons. When construction resumed in June 1869 (after the golden
Relief Art on Marker image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle, November 6, 2009
3. Relief Art on Marker
spike celebration at Promontory Summit), J.H. Strobridge and crew started at Vallejo Mills building a new line northwest towards Alameda/Oakland, while Turton, Knox & Ryan dispatched a crew to continue the railroad eastward in Alameda Cañon starting at the point where the 1866 Western Pacific rail stopped. Here's a quote from the 5 June 1869 Sacramento Daily Union: "Turton, Knox &. Ryan have detached a large number of their men from the Livermore Pass vicinity and set them grading and tracklaying on the lower end of the road, commencing twenty miles from San Jose, at the end of the section completed by the former owners of the franchise, and working up Alameda Canyon into Livermore Valley." By mid-August 1869, the railroad was completed from Vallejo Mills to the Livermore Valley.

Where was the controlling link of the first rail line from Sacramento to San Francisco Bay? Answer: the San Joaquin River railroad bridge at Mossdale. Upon its completion on 6 September 1869, the first through train from Sacramento arrived that evening at Alameda Wharf, thus completing the first transcontinental railroad to the Pacific coast. See the related marker First Transcontinental Railroad - Lathrop, Ca. for additional information."
    — Submitted December 21, 2019, by VK Wong of San Francisco, California.

 
Categories.
Completion of the Pacific Railroad image. Click for full size.
By Syd Whittle
4. Completion of the Pacific Railroad
This marker, located near Lathrop, California commemorates the completion of the railroad from Sacramento to the "Bay Area". This route went to Oakland and passengers and freight were then ferried across the Bay.
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More. Search the internet for Completion of the Transcontinental Railroad.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 22, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 13, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California. This page has been viewed 1,935 times since then and 19 times this year. Last updated on December 22, 2019, by VK Wong of San Francisco, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 13, 2009, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.   4. submitted on September 12, 2008, by Syd Whittle of El Dorado Hills, California.
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