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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Folsom in Sacramento County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

New Uses on the Rail Yard

Folsom Historic District

 
 
New Uses on the Rail Yard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 12, 2016
1. New Uses on the Rail Yard Marker
Inscription.  On April 19, 1877, the Sacramento Valley Railroad consolidated with the Folsom and Placerville Railroad to form the Sacramento and Placerville Pailroad. All machine work was transferred to Sacramento and the Folsom machine shop closed in 1878. In 1887, the roundhouse, no longer in use since the railroad ran to Placerville, was demolished. Shop buildings no longer used by the railroad operated as pipe factories, warehouses for dam construction, and as pear packing sheds. In 1889, a new passenger depot and adjacent water tower were constructed.

(Other side of marker)

The 1891 Sanborn fire insurance map shows a freight depot northwest of the tracks; a small passenger depot southeast of the tracks; a turn table, a jail in the northeast corner of the site, firemen's hall in the southeast corner, the turntable and unutilized or converted railroad shops in the southwest corner; two water towers; a yard; and groves of trees.

The railroad shops were torn down in 1895, and the bricks were reused in the construction of the folsom powerhouse. The Perkins freight depot was torn down in February 1897 when a freight

New Uses on the Rail Yard Marker (reverse) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 12, 2016
2. New Uses on the Rail Yard Marker (reverse)
room was added to the east end of the passenger depot. In 1898, the railroad came under the control of the Southern Pacific Railroad, and theFolsom depot remained in use. After the shop buildings were removed, the rail yard was used for new businesses such as fruit packing and storage. In the spring of 1902, the Earl Fruit Company built a fruit packing shed on the site of the old railroad shops. Fruit packing remained on the rail yard as late as the 1940s when the Digiorgio Fruit Packing Company was on site.

In 1913, the Folsom depot burned. In 1914, the depot was replaced with a Southern Pacific Number 22 combination freight-passenger depot. By 1917, the depot had been enlarged. The Southern Pacific railroad depot remained in service until 1971 and remains on site.
 
Location. 38° 40.643′ N, 121° 10.696′ W. Marker is in Folsom, California, in Sacramento County. Marker is on Wool Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 200 Wool Street, Folsom CA 95630, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ashland Station (within shouting distance of this marker); J. Clifton Toney (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Turning Locomotives in Folsom (about 300 feet away); Folsom History Museum (about 300 feet away); Folsom Pony Express Terminus

New Uses on the Rail Yard Marker - wide view, with the Folsom Depot in the background image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, April 12, 2016
3. New Uses on the Rail Yard Marker - wide view, with the Folsom Depot in the background
(about 300 feet away); Wells Fargo and Company (about 400 feet away); Sacramento Valley Railroad (about 400 feet away); Turning the Trains (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Folsom.
 
Also see . . .  Folsom Depot (NRHP Nomination form, PDF format). (Submitted on December 23, 2019.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceRailroads & Streetcars
 
Marker inset photo: Folsom Depot image. Click for full size.
Photo courtesy of the California Railroad Museum
4. Marker inset photo: Folsom Depot
 

More. Search the internet for New Uses on the Rail Yard.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 23, 2019. This page originally submitted on December 23, 2019, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 45 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 23, 2019, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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