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Near West Liberty in Logan County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

A Castle as a Farmhouse

They Lived Long on the Land

 
 
A Castle as a Farmhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Joel Seewald, October 12, 2019
1. A Castle as a Farmhouse Marker
Inscription.  
Construction of this stone mansion was begun in 1864 by General Abram Sanders Piatt (1821-1908). Finished in 1871, it replaced an earlier frame house where Abram had lived with his first wife Hannah and their children before her death in 1861 and his service in the Civil War. Named Mac-A-Cheek, the new castle-like dwelling was occupied by Abram and his second wife Eleanor, his younger children, domestic workers and farm laborers.

Not only a home, Mac-A-Cheek served as the hub of an evolving industrial, commercial and agricultural complex consisting of over 1,000 acres of tenant farms, merchant and custom mills and metal working shops. Like all farm houses of its day, it was the processing center for agricultural products: butter, cheese, meat, vegetables and fruit. In the basement was a large kitchen adjacent to several storage rooms containing the produce grown for family consumption.

Following Abram's death, his son William and wife Julia moved into Mac-A-Cheek where they supplemented their income by opening the house to tourists. This house, with its surrounding 80 acres is still owned by members of the Piatt
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family who continue to regard it as "home."

I follow the plow in the furrow,
    Turning over the rich mellow earth;
While green corn goes waving and flashing,
    As rejoicing with me in its mirth.
The rich soil is teeming with blessings,
    While I'm toiling its rich fruit outpours;
Its fullness of treasures surrounds me,
    'Mid the roses that bloom at the door.

            Gen. A. Sanders Piatt, date unknown

". . . Born in the city General Piatt was bred in the country. He was a son of the soil."
    Ben Piatt Runkle, "Abram Sanders Piatt," West Liberty Banner, March 26, 1908
 
Erected by Ohio Humanities Council, The Mac-A-Cheek Foundation for the Humanities, Piatt Castles.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureArchitectureIndustry & Commerce. A significant historical date for this entry is March 26, 1908.
 
Location. 40° 15.059′ N, 83° 43.609′ W. Marker is near West Liberty, Ohio, in Logan County. Marker can be reached from Township Road 47, 0.1 miles south of Ohio Route 245. Marker is next to the Mac-A-Cheek Castle, which is about 700 feet from Township Road 47. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 10051 Township Road 47, West Liberty OH 43357, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance
A Castle as a Farmhouse Marker — left image image. Click for full size.
2. A Castle as a Farmhouse Marker — left image
"Gen. A.S. Piatt is one of Logan County's most successful farmers and his broad acres to the number of 600 spread out over the Mac-a-cheek valley, a veritable garden spot, and his home is a stone mansion of stately architecture."
    "Gen. A. S. Piatt for Governor," Bellefontaine Examiner, 1902
of this marker. Over a Century of Tours (here, next to this marker); Who's in the Dog House? (a few steps from this marker); Let's Play (a few steps from this marker); Industry on the Macacheek (a few steps from this marker); From Generation to Generation (a few steps from this marker); Storing the Crops, Livestock and Machinery (within shouting distance of this marker); The Barn at Mac-A-Cheek Castle (within shouting distance of this marker); The Broad and Fertile Acres (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in West Liberty.
 
Also see . . .  Piatt Castles. Wikipedia article (Submitted on January 14, 2020, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.) 
 
A Castle as a Farmhouse Marker — middle images image. Click for full size.
3. A Castle as a Farmhouse Marker — middle images
Left: Abram Piatt's desk inside Mac-A-Cheek Castle
Right: As an innovator, Abram wrote articles for the Logan County Agricultural Society and as a Grange Master, he served as a leader in the local agricultural community.
"to Luther Smith Esq., President Logan County Agricultural Society: DEAR SIR:--In replying to your request to make a few suggestions in regard to breeding and rearing farm stock, . . . A. SANDERS PIATT"
    Tenth Annual Report of the Ohio Board of Agriculture, 1855
A Castle as a Farmhouse Marker — upper right image image. Click for full size.
4. A Castle as a Farmhouse Marker — upper right image
Mac-A-Cheek "Castle" was built with stone quarried from the Piatt land and wood sawn in the Piatt mill. Abram and Eleanor Piatt enjoyed horticulture and enhanced their home with a conservatory and flower garden.
A Castle as a Farmhouse Marker — lower right image image. Click for full size.
5. A Castle as a Farmhouse Marker — lower right image
Abram's earlier house was moved to another location on the property where it was the farm house of Abran's son Kentucky Ben and subsequent generations of Piatts.
A Castle as a Farmhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Joel Seewald, October 12, 2019
6. A Castle as a Farmhouse Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 23, 2020. It was originally submitted on January 14, 2020, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan. This page has been viewed 230 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on January 14, 2020, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.

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Jun. 20, 2024