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Agriculture Topic

 
Buena Vista Plantation Home image, Touch for more information
By Mark Hilton, December 17, 2013
Buena Vista Plantation Home
GEOGRAPHIC SORT WITH USA FIRST
1Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Buena VistaMontgomery-Janes-Wittaker Home — (circa 1830) —
This antebellum plantation house was completed by Capt. William Montgomery, a contemporary of Prattville's founder, Daniel Pratt. This “Deep South” architecture reflects the Federal style with the later addition of a Colonial . . . — Map (db m70795) HM
2Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Old Plank RoadCirca 1840's
The plank road was constructed of large pine logs, sawed lengthwise and laid round-side down. Daniel Pratt built the road for public benefit and to provide transportation from the Pratt Cotton Gin Factory to Washington on the Alabama River. Over . . . — Map (db m27983) HM
3Alabama (Autauga County), Prattville — Pratt HomesiteCirca 1842
Daniel Pratt, Prattville’s founding father, constructed an imposing home and garden within a quarter-mile of this site on Autauga Creek, near his industrial complex. The large home was designed and erected by Pratt himself, a noted architect / . . . — Map (db m27985) HM
4Alabama (Baldwin County), Loxley — Jenkins Farm / Jenkins Farmhouse
Jenkins Farm John Wesley Jenkins, born 1874, owned a 40 acre turpentine operation in 1915 when he married Amelia Taylor. With the decline of his turpentine resources, they began growing potatoes. At the time of John Wesley’s death in . . . — Map (db m155369) HM
5Alabama (Baldwin County), Perdido — Perdido Vineyards
"Alabama's First Farm Winery Since Prohibition" A 50 acre Muscadine Grape Vineyard was established at this site in 1972 to produce grapes for Bartels Winery of Pensacola, Florida. In 1979, legislation sponsored by Rep. John M. McMillan . . . — Map (db m122470) HM
6Alabama (Baldwin County), Stockton — Major Robert Farmar Plantation
Here on the banks of the Tensaw River -- named for the Tensa Indian tribe whose principal village was located at this place -- Major Robert Farmar developed a plantation c. 1772. Farmar was one of the most prominent and controversial Alabamians of . . . — Map (db m66380) HM
7Alabama (Baldwin County), Summerdale — Sonora Community / Sonora School and Community Hall
Sonora Community The community of Sonora was named in 1901 by the wife of the first postmaster, G.L. Sharretts. Situated near Red Hill Ford on Baker Branch and the intersection of travel routes between Silverhill, Magnolia Springs, Marlow . . . — Map (db m130878) HM
8Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Cotton and Creek Country — Creek Heritage Trail —
A primary factor in the eventual expulsion of the Creeks from their ancestral homeland was the fact that their territory was some of the best suited in the nation for the production of cotton. Containing enormous tracts of productive soils, a long . . . — Map (db m101658) HM
9Alabama (Barbour County), Eufaula — Hart House
Built by John Hart about 1850, the Hart House is recognized as an outstanding example of pure Greek Revival architecture. Hart (c. 1805-1863) moved from New Hampshire and became a prominent merchant and farmer. When constructed, the house was on the . . . — Map (db m48376) HM
10Alabama (Bibb County), Brierfield — Hayes-Morton House
Wilson Hayes constructed this typical farm house for his wife and six children just south of Six Mile around 1900. After he moved to Oklahoma c. 1915, his daughter Ollie and her husband Levert Rotenberry lived in the home until 1928. Between 1928 . . . — Map (db m37136) HM
11Alabama (Calhoun County), Jacksonville — Thomas A. Walker1811-1888
Prominent citizen of Jacksonville who served Alabama as Brigadier General, State Militia; member Legislature and Pres. of Senate; Circuit Court Judge; and Pres. Ala. and Tenn. Railroad He owned extensive cotton plantations and mining interests . . . — Map (db m29921) HM
12Alabama (Calhoun County), Oxford — Mississippi AgricultureAD 1000 to AD 1625 — Choccolocco Park Interpretive Trail —
The Mississippian inhabitants of Choccolocco were skilled agriculturalists who grew corn, squash and beans in addition to the many wild plants that they harvested. Archaeologists working here have found the remains of many of these plants in the . . . — Map (db m144950) HM
13Alabama (Clarke County), Claiborne — 93001517 — Dellet-Bedsole PlantationC. 1850 — National Register of Historic Places —
This 4000 acre complex has been recognized for its contribution to our understanding of the history of Monroe County and the State of Alabama. Originally developed as a cotton plantation during the Antebellum period, this farm has been in continuous . . . — Map (db m80345) HM
14Alabama (Clarke County), Jackson — First District Agricultural College and Experiment Station1896—1936
On this site was located the First District Agricultural College, authorized by an act of the Alabama Legislature and opened in 1896. The street in front was changed from Grove Hill Road to College Avenue in honor of the new school. An Experimental . . . — Map (db m101603) HM
15Alabama (Clay County), Ashland — Ashland, Alabama
Side 1 Clay County was formed by an act of the Alabama General Assembly on December 7, 1866. Less than a year later, Ashland was established as the county seat on land donated by Hollingsworth Watts for the construction of a . . . — Map (db m95087) HM
16Alabama (Coffee County), Enterprise — Boll Weevil MonumentDecember 11, 1919
In profound appreciation of the Boll Weevil and what it has done as the Herald of Prosperity this monument was erected by the Citizens of Enterprise, Coffee County, Alabama — Map (db m30306) HM
17Alabama (Colbert County), Cherokee — A Chickasaw PlanterNatchez Trace Parkway
During the early 1800s, a slave-owning planter class including George Colbert’s family, emerged among the Chickasaw. George’s success stemmed from a variety of endeavors. He fought with the Americans against the Shawnee and Creeks, traveled to . . . — Map (db m107261) HM
18Alabama (Colbert County), Tuscumbia — Belle Mont
Built between 1828 and 1832, Belle Mont is a foremost example of Jeffersonian Palladian Architecture in the deep south and one of Alabama's first great plantation houses. It was build for Dr. Alexander W. Mitchell, a native of Virginia, and a . . . — Map (db m29561) HM
19Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — King Pharr Canning Company Operated Here1946~1976
In 1946, the McPhillips family brought King Pharr Canning Company, a major vegetable canning operation to Cullman. Led by chairman Julian B. McPhillips of Mobile, and his two sons Julian L. McPhillips and W. Warren McPhillips (returning from Navy . . . — Map (db m101093) HM
20Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — Land-Use and Water Quality
Land-based activities affect water quality and quantity. For that reason, it is important that we make good decisions about our day to day actions. Dry stacks prevent poultry manure from entering streams. Silt fences prevent erosion from . . . — Map (db m107957) HM
21Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — Sand Mountain Plateau
Thrifty German colonists, led by Col. John G. Cullman, in 1873 settled this thinly populated plateau. This section, previously thought unproductive, became famous for its diversified crops.Map (db m29976) HM
22Alabama (Cullman County), Cullman — What’s the Big Deal about Litter?!
Litter or trash thrown on our roadside or illegally dumped often ends up in a steam or creek. This threatens the critters that live there and it can threaten humans too! Thankfully, litter is an easy problem to fix - If everyone does their . . . — Map (db m106102)
23Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Alabama's Native Prairie
Waist-high grasses billowing in the wind. Rolling prairie expanses. Most people connect these images with the Midwest's Great Plains. But for thousands of years, tallgrass soils of Alabama's Black Belt. Along prairie—25 miles across . . . — Map (db m112692) HM
24Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Black Belt Transformations
Alabama's Black Belt region derives its name from a narrow sash of dark, fertile soil across the state's midsection. Covering 1000 square miles, the Black Belt occupies just 2% of the state's landmass, but its history and transformations . . . — Map (db m112800) HM
25Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — Perine Well
This artesian well was drilled to serve a factory which did not materialize. It was then used to water the grounds, a garden and pastures. In addition, by forcing water through pipes into his $50,000 home, E. M. Perine, a merchant prince, had the . . . — Map (db m83518) HM
26Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Duke of Cahaba
In 1889, Samuel and Sarah Kirkpatrick moved to Selma, leaving their farm and house in the capable hands of their son Clifton (1863-1930). He turned the abandoned remains of Alabama's first capital into a showcase farm of diversified, scientific . . . — Map (db m23005) HM
27Alabama (Dallas County), Cahaba — The Duke of Cahaba
Look around you. There are hundreds of pecan trees growing nearby. All were planted by Clifton Kirkpatrick, a.k.a. The Duke of Cahaba." (Note: Cahawba lost its "w" by the late 19th century.) In 1889 Samuel and Sarah Kirkpatrick . . . — Map (db m112473) HM
28Alabama (Henry County), Headland — Head's Land Yielded Fruits of Success
Begun on 160 acres of land owned by Dr. Joshua Head, "Head's Land," or Headland, was established in 1871, incorporated as a town in 1884 and a city in 1893. The land itself yielded the city's first industry. Due to the abundance of pine trees, . . . — Map (db m71816) HM
29Alabama (Jefferson County), Birmingham — East Birmingham
Marker Front: Founded in 1886 on 600 acres of land, East Birmingham was the agricultural area consisting primarily of dairy farms extending to the present Birmingham airport. The East Birmingham Land Company that developed the area was . . . — Map (db m83827) HM
30Alabama (Jefferson County), Hoover — Overseer’s HouseBuilt in 1889
This house was provided for the overseer of the 560-acre A. B. Howell Peach Orchard. William Morgan and William and Evan Hale were overseers. The house was purchased by John and Marie Taylor in 1989 and was placed on the Alabama Register of . . . — Map (db m28494) HM
31Alabama (Jefferson County), Leeds — Rowan House
Thomas Rowan, son of Irish immigrants who settled in St. Clair County, Alabama, purchased his first 130 acres at auction and built a house here by c. 1854 that probably forms the core of the two northeast rooms. Heir John Thomas Rowan and his wife, . . . — Map (db m24716) HM
32Alabama (Jefferson County), McCalla — Pioneer Farm BuildingsCirca 1870's
1. Gear House 2. Smoke House 3. Corn Crib 4. Double Pole Barn Donated by Mr. & Mrs. Carthell Kornegay. These buildings were located on the George Stewart Farm in Bibb County and restored in 1975… — Map (db m107513) HM
33Alabama (Jefferson County), McCalla — Williams HouseCirca 1889
James Monroe "Jim" Williams married Martha Evaline George. Mr. Williams was a farmer and a coal miner at Gray Hill in Bibb County, Alabama. They raised ten children, of which seven were born in this house. Donated by Mrs. Audry . . . — Map (db m107511) HM
34Alabama (Jefferson County), Mountain Brook — Robert Jemison, Jr. (1878-1974) / The Old Mill (1927)
Robert Jemison, Jr. (1878-1974) The Father of Mountain Brook A man of great vision, dreams and enthusiasm, Robert Jemison, Jr. was by far the greatest real estate developer of Birmingham’s 20th century. The Post-Herald newspaper . . . — Map (db m83922) HM
35Alabama (Lamar County), Sulligent — John Hollis BankheadAncestral Home — 1842 — 1920 —
Farmer Confederate Soldier Legislator Member U.S. House and Senate Thirty Three Years Father of Federal Aid to Good Roads Author making Warrior longest canalized river in the world Active in development of Muscle Shoals and other . . . — Map (db m96473) HM
36Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Deibert Park-dedicated May 25, 2000-
This park was donated to the people of Florence by Dr. Kirk R. and Lillian Cook Deibert who initially acquired this property in 1952. The acreage was once a part of a large ante-bellum plantation owned by Judge Sidney Cherry Posey. In 1875 his heirs . . . — Map (db m33086) HM
37Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Dr. Amit RoyCity of Florence Walk of Honor
Named President of the International Fertilizer Development Center in 1992, Dr. Amit Roy distinguished himself as a leader of a team to create sustainable agricultural productivity worldwide, alleviating hunger and ensuring food security. . . . — Map (db m99379) HM
38Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Edward Asbury O'Neal, IIICity of Florence Walk of Honor
Serving 16 years as president of the American Farm Bureau Federation (1931-1947), Mr. O'Neal developed major New Deal farm policies in the Franklin D. Roosevelt Administration. — Map (db m28906) HM
39Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Frank Perron AchornCity of Florence Walk of Honor
In 1947 Frank Achorn began his successful work as a chemical engineer in 45 states and 40 countries to feed the hungry of the world through increased crop yields. He later secured eight patents related to the fertilizer industry. — Map (db m56373) HM
40Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — John Thomas Bulls, JrCity of Florence Walk of Honor
For 21 years following the end of World War II, John Bulls served as Agricultural Extension Advisor for the U.S. State Dept. in India, Nigeria, Tunisia and Uganda, assisting farmers and organizing community development programs. — Map (db m84025) HM
41Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — McFarland Park and Recreation Area
This bottom land serves as a reservoir for TVA's flood control program. Florence leases it for recreational purposes when not being used by TVA. Major Robert McFarland, a native of Ireland, his wife, Kate Armstead McFarland, and their seven . . . — Map (db m28453) HM
42Alabama (Lauderdale County), Florence — Wilson Family Cemetery 19th Century / Slave Cemetery 19th Century
Side A In 1818 three Wilson brothers John, Matthew and Samuel, came from Virginia to purchase large farms in this area. The plantations of John and Matthew joined near this cemetery. All three brothers and their families are buried here. . . . — Map (db m28160) HM
43Alabama (Lauderdale County), Lexington — French-Glover Farm 1837
Revolutionary War Veteran Benjamin French (1764-1847), a native of Virginia, is buried at this site. Arriving in Limestone County, Alabama, about 1808 French acquired this farm in 1837. The nearby spring is the site of prehistoric Indian Village . . . — Map (db m141982) HM
44Alabama (Lawrence County), Courtland — A Cotton Kingdom
A combination of rich soil, mild climate and ready access to market via river and later railroad made Courtland an early center of cotton production. From surrounding plantations with colorful names like Bonnie Doone, Oak Grove, Rocky Hill, . . . — Map (db m71285) HM
45Alabama (Lawrence County), Courtland — The Town of Courtland / Early Settlers1819
Side A Federal lands in this area were first sold in 1818 and quickly purchased by settlers and speculators. A group of investors calling themselves the “Courtland Land Company” and consisting of William H. Whitaker, James M. . . . — Map (db m28989) HM
46Alabama (Lee County), Auburn — Noble Hall
Marker Front: The Greek Revival rock and mortar house was built by Addison Frazer (1809-1873) between 1852 and 1854 and served as the center for a 2,000 acre cotton plantation. Frazer owned 100 slaves and was on the Board of Trustees of . . . — Map (db m25988) HM
47Alabama (Lee County), Auburn — The Cullars Rotation / The Alvis Field and Cotton Rust
Side 1 The Cullars Rotation The Cullars Rotation is the oldest, continuous soil fertility study in the South and the second oldest cotton study in the world. It was started in 1911 by the Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station . . . — Map (db m74463) HM
48Alabama (Lee County), Auburn — The Old Rotation
Established in 1896 by Professor J.F. Duggar, the Old Rotation at Auburn University is: (1) the oldest, continuous cotton experiment in the U.S.; and (2) the 3rd oldest continuous field crop experiment in the U.S.; and (3) the 1st experiment to . . . — Map (db m74429) HM
49Alabama (Lee County), Opelika — Top Rock Millstone
This "Top Rock" Millstone was in a grist mill owned and operated by W.S.A. Bence on Sweetwater Creek in Clay County, AL 1919-1947 Donated by H.S. Bence — Map (db m75160) HM
50Alabama (Limestone County), Athens — Courthouse and Poor Farm Fence
A section of the fence that surrounded the 'Court House' grounds until 1916. When construction of the present building was planned, the fence was moved to the County Poor Farm on Elkton Rd. This section donated to the people of Limestone County by . . . — Map (db m85390) HM
51Alabama (Limestone County), Athens — James Edwin Horton, Jr.1878-1973
On June 22, 1933, Judge James Horton of Athens set aside the verdict and death sentence of an all-white jury that found Haywood Patterson, an African American, guilty of raping two white women. Patterson was one of nine black youths falsely accused . . . — Map (db m154195) HM
52Alabama (Limestone County), Greenbrier — Druid's Grove Plantation / Jones-Donnell Cemetery
VA native John Nelson Spotswood Jones, son of Rev. War Capt. Lewellen Jones, cousin of Martha Washington, and descendant of Rev. Rowland Jones of Williamsburg's Bruton Parish, built Druid's Grove near this site before 1820 and established the . . . — Map (db m70235) HM
53Alabama (Limestone County), Mooresville — Cottonport / Mooresville
Front The town of Cottonport flourished in the early years of Limestone County. It was settled in 1818 and chartered in 1824. It was located approx. 1½ miles S.E. near the point where Limestone Creek flowed into the Tennessee River and . . . — Map (db m85455) HM
54Alabama (Limestone County), Tanner — Cotton Hillcirca 1824
A grand two story brick house built in the Federal style with a double tier pedimented Palladian portico. The house displays architectural features brought to Limestone County by early settlers from Southside Virginia, and adjacent North . . . — Map (db m90915) HM
55Alabama (Limestone County), Tanner — Gamble House
One of the oldest brick houses in the country. It was built, circa 1822-28, by Wm. Parham for Joseph Johnston, the original landowner. It displays both Georgian and Federal influences in its style and details. A molded brick water table and . . . — Map (db m117805) HM
56Alabama (Macon County), Shorter — Prairie Farms Resettlement Community
(obverse) Beginning in the mid-1930s during the Great Depression, the federal New Deal promoted Land Resettlement to move farmers across the nation off worn out soil to new farmland. The Resettlement Administration, and its successor the . . . — Map (db m68000) HM
57Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Carver's Laboratory — Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site —
The primary idea in all of my work was to help the farmer and fill the poor man's empty dinner pail . . . —George Washington Carver George Washington Carver taught classes and developed new products from peanuts, . . . — Map (db m101938) HM
58Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — George Washington CarverDied in Tuskegee Alabama — January 5, 1943 —
A life that stood out as a gospel of self-forgetting service. He could have added fortune to fame but caring for neither he found happiness and honor in being helpful to the world. The centre of his world was the South where he was born in . . . — Map (db m100165) HM
59Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Thomas Monroe Campbell
. . . — Map (db m102540) HM
60Alabama (Macon County), Tuskegee Institute — Tuskegee ChapelTuskegee Institute National Historic Site — National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior —
. . . I always make it a rule to read a chapter [in the Bible] or a portion of a chapter in the morning, before beginning the work of the day. —Booker T. Washington, Up From Slavery The chapel, designed by Paul . . . — Map (db m100162) HM
61Alabama (Madison County), Huntsville — Schrimsher FarmSunrise Terrace Subdivision
Caroline (Cherokee) & William (Scotch-Irish) Schrimsher first of four generations to farm this 36 acres from 1880-1939. After World War II Wernher von Braun's team of scientists were brought from Germany to Ft. Bliss, Texas and then to Huntsville, . . . — Map (db m154271) HM
62Alabama (Madison County), New Market — Madison County Poorhouse Farm Site and CemeteryNew Market, Alabama — 1870-1923 —
For 53 years Madison County operated an establishment one-half mile to the south where the indigent, lame, and unfortunate were housed in a series of log buildings. Each year a superintendent and a physician were appointed to care for their needs. . . . — Map (db m154290) HM
63Alabama (Madison County), New Market — Town of New Market
Settled by Pioneers early as 1806. Voting Precinct established 1827. Town incorporated 1837. George Smith, major landowner of town site, built first log house and established mercantile business, 1814. John Miller excavated millrace, erected . . . — Map (db m31657) HM
64Alabama (Madison County), Triana — Triana, Alabama
Originally called “The Prairie” by the Chickasaw Indians who settled here, Triana was incorporated November 13, 1819 as the second town in Madison County. The community purportedly was named after Rodrigo de Triana, the crewman who first . . . — Map (db m70237) HM
65Alabama (Marengo County), Demopolis — Gaineswood
Built 1842-1860 by Gen. Nathan Bryan Whitfield 1799-1868 accomplished planter of the Canebrake using imported materials and artisans Glorifying the Greek Revival Architecture by combining Doric exterior Corinthian grand ballroom Ionic parlor . . . — Map (db m38068) HM
66Alabama (Marshall County), Arab — Farmer's Exchange
The Farmer’s Exchange was a focal point of commerce during the early years of the young town of Arab. Farmers exchanged their corn, eggs, butter, hides and other agricultural products for a barrel of flour, a stand of lard or other . . . — Map (db m40627) HM
67Alabama (Marshall County), Boaz — City of Boaz
Side A Informally called Sparkstown for a period of time, the city of Boaz was officially named after the husband of Ruth, a Biblical character in the Old Testament. Incorporated in March 1897, Boaz quickly began to "set a pace for her . . . — Map (db m39156) HM
68Alabama (Mobile County), Mobile — Richards D.A.R. House Museum — 1860 —
One of the premier antebellum structures in the city, the house was built by Charles Richards, a riverboat captain originally from Maine. The building is considered to have Mobile's finest cast iron, featuring figures in a garden setting and . . . — Map (db m86511) HM
69Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Teague Road
This 2.8-mile road connecting U.S. highways 331 and 31 first appeared on Montgomery County road maps in 1928. Land for the road was deeded to Montgomery County in September 1926 by local landowners from the Teague, Bellingrath and Matthews families. . . . — Map (db m70932) HM
70Alabama (Montgomery County), Montgomery — Teague Road
This 2.8-mile road connecting U.S. highways 331 and 31 first appeared on Montgomery County road maps in 1928. Land for the road was deeded to Montgomery County in September 1926 by local landowners from the Teague, Bellingrath and Matthews families. . . . — Map (db m99235) HM
71Alabama (Montgomery County), Pintlala — Pintlala Grange Hall / Grange Hall School
(Side 1) Pintlala Grange Hall The National Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry was organized in 1867 to provide economic, social and cultural improvements for farmers and their families. Pintlala's Grange Hall was erected circa . . . — Map (db m71433) HM
72Alabama (Morgan County), Decatur — Health and Civic WelfareRestoring the Vision ... Preserving the Legacy
"The opportunies which were at hand in the development of the river and the region were being seized upon by our people with renewed courage and confidence. We now know that we couldn't be licked again, that what had been preached to us by TVA was . . . — Map (db m86505) HM
73Alabama (Pike County), Brundidge — City of Brundidge and the Bass House / Brundidge's Peanut Butter Heritage
Side 1 City of Brundidge and the Bass House Brundidge was founded in 1851 and incorporated in 1890. Brundidge City Hall has been located in the former Bass House on South Main Street in downtown Brundidge since November 1992. . . . — Map (db m71796) HM
74Alabama (Pike County), Orion — Orion Institute
Founded 1848 by legislative act and donations of citizens. Excellent instruction made it only school of kind for youth in area. Later used as public school until 1929 school consolidation. Orion settled about 1815, by 1830 saw arrival of . . . — Map (db m71791) HM
75Alabama (Russell County), Hurtsboro — Long FamilyNimrod Long House
Nimrod Washington Long moved to Alabama from Georgia in the 1830s. A planter, mill owner and state legislator, he had real estate and railroad interests in Russell County. This house was the plantation home of Nimrod Washington Long in Spring Hill, . . . — Map (db m69433) HM
76Alabama (Russell County), Phenix City — Coweta and Northeastern Russell County:Focal Point for Creek-American Diplomacy — Creek Heritage Trail —
During the tumultuous decades prior to the Removal of the Creeks from their ancestral homelands in the 1830s, the vicinity of the town of Coweta became an important location for interaction between the Creek Nation and the American government. . . . — Map (db m101339) HM
77Alabama (Talladega County), Sylacauga — Hightower Brothers Livery Stable
Founded in 1896 by brothers John Judge and Milton Graham Hightower, this small-town livery stable served the community and surrounding countryside until its closing in 1955. Originally located nearby, the business moved to this “New . . . — Map (db m57763) HM
78Alabama (Tallapoosa County), Dadeville — Fletcher Napoleon Farrington, Sr.1902 - 1968 — County Agent and Civic Leader —
Fletcher Farrington, after graduating from the Alabama Polytechnic Institute (now Auburn University), came to Tallapoosa County as a county agent for the Agricultural Extension Service in 1932. Concluding that soil erosion was the local farmers . . . — Map (db m95105) HM
79Alabama (Tuscaloosa County), Tuscaloosa — Benjamin FitzpatrickGovernor 1841 - 1845
He oversaw the closing of the unstable State Bank. In 1845 the legislature amended the constitution to allow the removal of the capital from Tuscaloosa. The growing wealth and population of the Black Belt brought the seat of government to Montgomery. — Map (db m29033) HM
80Arizona (Apache County), Eagar — 14 — Joseph Udall Barn
Built in the early 1900s by one of Eagar's prominent civic, religious & business leaders, this barn was constructed with wooden pegs & retains remarkable architectural integrity. The 2-story brick farmhouse no longer stands. — Map (db m36640) HM
81Arizona (Apache County), Springerville — 5 — Old Grist Mill Site1876
Just west on the river, W.R Milligan built the first grist mill & sawmill in Round Valley, later a brick kiln was added. Subsequent owners included the Udall Bros. & J.P. Rothlisberger who built the barn just ahead. — Map (db m158475) HM
82Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — Beale Wagon Road1857 - 1882
From 1857-60, Lt. Edward F. Beale and a crew of 100 men completed the first federal highway in the southwest from Fort Smith, Ark. to Los Angeles, Calif. at a cost of $200,000. The wagon road was used extensively by immigrants en route to California . . . — Map (db m33346) HM
83Arizona (Coconino County), Flagstaff — The Old Tractor
This 1945 Model H International Farmall, purchased by the Zanzucchi Family after World War II, was used to plow the "Fields" at the Flagstaff Dairy. The Flagstaff Dairy operated from 1904 thru 1979 and was located 3 miles west of Flagstaff on Old . . . — Map (db m78740) HM
84Arizona (Coconino County), Grand Canyon National Park — Mules and the Canyon
Behind you is the Bright Angel mule corral, where each morning mules greet riders and another adventure begins. Mules have carried people into Grand Canyon since sightseeers first visited here in the 1890s. For many people - including those who . . . — Map (db m39551) HM
85Arizona (Coconino County), Jacob Lake — Jacob Lake Lookout Tower
This location has two markers This steel lookout tower is 80 feet tall and has a 7 foot by 7 foot steel cab on top. It was erected in 1934. As guardians of our nation's vast timber reserves, the U.S. Forest Service has always given fire . . . — Map (db m94919) HM
86Arizona (Coconino County), Mormon Lake — Mormon Dairy
Between 1876 and 1886, Hyrum Judd, under the direction of Lot Smith, supervised a Mormon Dairy one mile northeast near Dairy Spring. Beginning with a herd of 115 cows, large quantities of butter and cheese were produced. During the 1880s the . . . — Map (db m35187) HM
87Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — 2 — Fruit Packing HouseCity of Sedona Landmark No. 2
In 1946, Walter Jordan's orchard business had expanded. This building was constructed to house an apple grading machine and other fruit packing operations. Walter Jordan operated the orchards until 1973. — Map (db m94848) HM
88Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — Indian GardensHomesite of the First Settler in Oak Creek Canyon
In 1876 or 1877, Jim Thompson built a log cabin here and began cultivating the old Indian Gardens where the Indians had grown corn and squash long before Oak Creek was known to white men. Thompson remained here at his Indian Gardens Ranch until his . . . — Map (db m33203) HM
89Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — 3 — Jordan Tractor ShedCity of Sedona Landmark No. 3
Built in c1929 by Walter Jordan to house tractors and other farm implements for use in the Jordan Orchards. — Map (db m94847) HM
90Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — Orchards (1890 - 1970)
Fruit growing played a significant role in the early Sedona economy. Over time, settlers constructed ditches, flumes, pipelines, reservoirs, and water wheels to provide irrigation to their gardens and eventually to their larger orchards. Apples . . . — Map (db m54228) HM
91Arizona (Coconino County), Sedona — Van Deren Ranch
Lee Van Deren, cattleman, arrived to put his children in the new Sedona school opened in 1910. Ranching was a major part of Sedona’s early economy. Round ups and cattle drives were a twice a year occurrence for ranchers when moving their herds from . . . — Map (db m54229) HM
92Arizona (Coconino County), Walnut Canyon National Monument — Departure
Despite all it had to offer, in time Walnut Canyon became a difficult place for farmers to live. Drier, colder conditions meant crop failures. More people and diminished resources meant nutritional stress, disease, and conflict. However, these . . . — Map (db m61370) HM
93Arizona (Coconino County), Wupatki National Monument — Nalakihu
Nalakihu - A modern Hopi name, "House Outside the Village" Farmers lived here about 800 years ago. (Roof beams gave tree ring dates in the late 1100s.) The way the walls join show this small pueblo was not built all at once, but was added onto. . . . — Map (db m41713) HM
94Arizona (Coconino County), Wupatki National Monument — Where Were The Fields?
Farming then did not mean vast fields like we use today. Anasazi and Sinagua people modified these small terraces to grow hand-tended corn, cotton, beans, and squash. We know the climate was about what it is now, very dry for farming. The terraces . . . — Map (db m41715) HM
95Arizona (Gila County), Globe — Site of Sheriff Thompson's HomeHistoric Site
John Henry Thompson, a noted Gila County pioneer, brought his bride, Carrie Louise Nash, to Globe to live in the house he had built on this site, one of the town's early adobe buildings. Thompson was active in mining, cattle ranching and the feed . . . — Map (db m34119) HM
96Arizona (La Paz County), Cibola — 104 — Cibola Arizona
Gold and silver strikes in the 1860's created growth in the area. It is said Wyatt Earp served as sheriff of Cibola for one year in the 1890's. The town of Cibola formed in 1898 and construction began on a 16 mile canal to bring water from the river . . . — Map (db m78552) HM
97Arizona (Maricopa County), Chandler — Arizona Cotton Land
The land surrounding this cemetery represents the beginning of commercial cotton growing in Arizona. In January 1917, during World War I, the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company founded the Southwest Cotton Company to begin producing long-staple . . . — Map (db m34554) HM
98Arizona (Maricopa County), Chandler — Arthur E. Price1889 – 1971 — “Patriarch of Chandler” —
Chandler’s First City Attorney Filed Incorporation Papers Drafted the City Constitution and By-Laws Farmer – Land Developer — Map (db m70997) HM
99Arizona (Maricopa County), Chandler — Dr. A. J. Chandler1859 – 1950
He knew no yesterdays His living was for tomorrow Founder of the town of Chandler Built the San Marcos Hotel Arizona’s first veterinarian Father of modern irrigation system Pioneer rancher and developer of the southside area of . . . — Map (db m70990) HM
100Arizona (Maricopa County), Glendale — Blacksmith and Machine Shopat Sahuaro Ranch…
Farm and ranch work have always been hard on machinery, making frequent repairs necessary. Throughout Sahuaro Ranch's history, most of these repairs were made here by the ranch's own employees. This building, which is believed to have been . . . — Map (db m40676) HM

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Oct. 27, 2020