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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Tuscaloosa in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Howard-Linton Barbershop

Tuscaloosa Civil Rights History Trail

 
 
Howard-Linton Barbershop Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 19, 2020
1. Howard-Linton Barbershop Marker
Inscription.  In September 1952, Autherine Lucy's application to the University of Alabama was accepted. When she arrived on campus and the university officials discovered that she was African-American, they denied her admission. In 1955, following Brown vs. Board of Education-which struck down segregation in public schools -the NAACP secured a court order forcing the university to accept Lucy. In 1956, at age 27, Lucy enrolled as a graduate student in Library Science. She attended her first class on Friday, February 3. On Monday, February 6, when Lucy arrived on campus for class, she was met by a mob estimated to be over a thousand that pelted her with rocks and eggs and threatened to kill her. She narrowly escaped and found refuge in Howard-Linton Barber Shop. White community members pursued, but the police, and especially a hastily organized protective guard composed of armed black men ringing the barbershop, scared them off. Later that afternoon, five cars driven by black men pulled in front of the barbershop. They hid Lucy in one of the cars-so the mob would not know which car she was in-and escaped with her to Birmingham.
The Howard-Linton Barbershop and Marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 19, 2020
2. The Howard-Linton Barbershop and Marker.

Seven years later, the Howard-Linton Barbershop again served an important part in a march for civil rights that would come to be known as "Bloody Tuesday."

When Tuscaloosa County planned a new courthouse, officials assured the black community that there would be no segregated facilities. But, when the courthouse opened, there were separate bathrooms and water fountains. On June 9, 1964, members of the Civil Rights movement in Tuscaloosa, led by Rev. T. Y. Rogers, Jr., attempted to march from First African Baptist Church to the courthouse in a non-violent protest against the segregated facilities. Police and white extremists attacked them sending 34 to the hospital and 94 to jail-more than would be hospitalized or jailed on Bloody Sunday in Selma a year later. Many of the wounded retreated to the Howard-Linton Barber shop. There was not a towel in the shop not covered with blood. Community members provided first aid, while Rev. T. W. Linton called US Attorney General Robert Kennedy and Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., who were standing by to offer assistance.
 
Erected 2019 by Tuscaloosa Civil Rights History Task Force. (Marker Number 18.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil Rights.
 
Location.

View north from marker on T.Y. Rogers Jr Avenue. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 19, 2020
3. View north from marker on T.Y. Rogers Jr Avenue.
33° 12.043′ N, 87° 34.141′ W. Marker is in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, in Tuscaloosa County. Marker is on T.Y. Rogers Jr Avenue north of 14th Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1311 TY Rogers Jr Avenue, Tuscaloosa AL 35401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Chabannes - Sealy House (approx. ¼ mile away); Greenwood Cemetery (approx. ¼ mile away); The Jemison Home (approx. ¼ mile away); Historic Site (approx. 0.3 miles away); First African Baptist Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Friedman Home (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named First African Baptist Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); First Presbyterian Church (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tuscaloosa.
 
Regarding Howard-Linton Barbershop. Thomas Linton began cutting hair in 1951 and still cuts hair several days a week at this shop located on T.Y. Rogers Avenue.
 
Tuscaloosa Civil Rights History Trail map. image. Click for full size.
By Tuscaloosa Civil Rights History Task Force
4. Tuscaloosa Civil Rights History Trail map.
As of this date, three trail markers have been installed.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 23, 2020. It was originally submitted on January 23, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 102 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 23, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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Jan. 15, 2021