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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hyattsville in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

To Serve and Defend / Brown V. Board of Education of Topeka

 
 
To Serve and Defend side of the marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 28, 2020
1. To Serve and Defend side of the marker
Inscription.  
To Serve and Defend

Each of the original 13 colonies had the right and the obligation to establish a militia to protect and defend its citizens. Those rights and obligations were subsequently adopted by the Second Continental Congress, when it established the Continental Army in June 1775.

Throughout American history, America's sons and daughters have served to protect and defend America's shores, borders, allies and interests around the world. By the end of the year 2001, 42,348,460 Americans had served in the military, including 217,000 in the Revolutionary War; 3,263,363 in the Civil War; 4,734,991 in World War I; 16,112,566 in World War II; 5,270,000 in the Korean War; and 9,200,000 in the Vietnam War.

These Revolutionary War documents depict each recruit's oath of enlistment, declaration, and date of death, if the death occurred while in service. Like the millions of service personnel who came after them, they were willing to risk their lives for liberty, freedom, and democracy.

The copies of these documents were provided by the National Archives and Records Administration.

Brown
Brown V. Board of Education of Topeka side of the marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 28, 2020
2. Brown V. Board of Education of Topeka side of the marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
V. Board of Education of Topeka

Brown V. Board of Education of Topeka, a consolidation of cases before the United States Supreme Court from Delaware, South Carolina, Virginia and Kansas, was the landmark case that challenged the constitutionality of racial segregation of public schools.

The attorney who successfully argued the case was Baltimore native Thurgood Marshall (1908-1993). Twenty-three years after this ruling, Marshall became the first black Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, serving with honor and distinction from October 1967 through July 1991.

In Thurgood Marshall's words:
Education cannot be separated from the social environment in which the child lives. He cannot attend separate schools and learn the meaning of equality.

In its unanimous ruling on May 17, 1954, the Supreme Court held that "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal," which led to the banning of school segregation and the end of legal barriers to equal education in the United States.

Here, in parts, are the words of Chief Justice Earl Warren:
Today, education is perhaps the most important function of state and local governments.... It is the very foundation of good citizenship.... It is a principal instrument in awakening the
To Serve and Defend / Brown V. Board of Education of Topeka Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 28, 2020
3. To Serve and Defend / Brown V. Board of Education of Topeka Marker
The marker is the second from the left.
child to cultural values ... and in helping him to adjust normally to his environment....

We come then to the question presented: does segregation of children in public schools solely on the basis of race, even though the physical facilities and other "tangible" factors may be equal, deprive the children of the minority group of equal educational opportunities? We believe that it does.

This article has been reprinted with the permission of the Topeka Capital-Journal.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: African AmericansCivil RightsEducationWar, KoreanWar, US CivilWar, US RevolutionaryWar, VietnamWar, World IWar, World II. A significant historical date for this entry is May 17, 1954.
 
Location. 38° 58.187′ N, 76° 57.141′ W. Marker is in Hyattsville, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Toledo Road just west of America Boulevard, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6525 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville MD 20782, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Treaty at Fort McIntosh / President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "Day of Infamy" Address (here, next to this marker); The Declaration of Independence / President John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address (here, next to this
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marker); The Constitution / The 19th Amendment (here, next to this marker); A Nation of Immigrants / The Original 13 States (a few steps from this marker); The Bill of Rights / The Statue of Liberty (a few steps from this marker); The Louisiana Purchase / Edison's Light Bulb Patent (a few steps from this marker); The Lewis & Clark Expedition / The 15th Amendment (a few steps from this marker); The Gettysburg Address / The Emancipation Proclamation (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hyattsville.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 29, 2020. It was originally submitted on February 28, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 58 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 28, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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Apr. 11, 2021