Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hyattsville in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Bill of Rights / The Statue of Liberty

 
 
The Bill of Rights side of the marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 28, 2020
1. The Bill of Rights side of the marker
Inscription.  
The Bill of Rights

On September 25, 1789, the Congress passed a resolution offering twelve amendments to the newly ratified Constitution.

Ten of these amendments, known as the Bill of Rights because they address individual liberties, were added to the Constitution on December 15, 1791, the first two having to do with Congressional representation and compensation, were not adopted as part of the Bill of Rights.

Amendment I:
Freedom of religion, speech, press and assembly
Right to petition Congress for redress of grievances

Amendment II:
A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.

Amendment III:
Quartering of troops in homes requires the consent of the owner.

Amendment IV:
Protection against unreasonable searches and seizures

Amendment V:
Grand jury indicts for capital crimes
Protection against double jeopardy and self-incrimination
Due process required when life, liberty, and property are at state

Amendment
The Statue of Liberty side of the marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 28, 2020
2. The Statue of Liberty side of the marker
Click or scan to see
this page online
VI:
Criminal Prosecutions: right to speedy and public jury trial
Right to confront witnesses
Right to counsel

Amendment VII:
Common law suits: right to jury trial

Amendment VII:
Protection from excess bail or fines
Protection from cruel and unusual punishment

Amendment IX:
The enumeration in the Constitution of certain rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.

Amendment X:
The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are reserved to the states.

The original resolution is on permanent display at the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C.

The Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty, a universal symbol of freedom and democracy, was a gift from the people of France to the United States, given in celebration of America's 100th year of independence.

The 151,063-foot copper statue (from the ground to the top of the torch, the statue is 305,083 feet) was designed by the French sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi, who appropriately named it "Liberty Enlightening the World."

Adding greatly to its splendor is Emma Lazarus's sonnet, "The New Colossus," which was written for an auction held in December
The Bill of Rights / The Statue of Liberty Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, February 28, 2020
3. The Bill of Rights / The Statue of Liberty Marker
The marker is fourth from the right.
1883 to raise money for the construction of the statue's pedestal.

To those whose first welcoming sight of America was Lady Liberty — and to those who still dream — the closing lines of the sonnet remain poignant:

Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore
Send these, the homeless, tempest—tost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden door!

On October 28, 1886, President Grover Cleveland accepted the statue on behalf of the citizens of the United States, and 38 years later on October 15, 1924, the statue was designated a national monument.

The original deed of gift is in the National Archives of the United States.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Arts, Letters, MusicCivil RightsWomen. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #22 and #24 Grover Cleveland series list. A significant historical date for this entry is September 25, 1789.
 
Location. 38° 58.187′ N, 76° 57.149′ W. Marker is in Hyattsville, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Toledo Road just west of America Boulevard, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6525 Belcrest Road, Hyattsville MD 20782, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
are within walking distance of this marker. A Nation of Immigrants / The Original 13 States (here, next to this marker); The Louisiana Purchase / Edison's Light Bulb Patent (here, next to this marker); The Constitution / The 19th Amendment (here, next to this marker); The Lewis & Clark Expedition / The 15th Amendment (here, next to this marker); The Treaty at Fort McIntosh / President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's "Day of Infamy" Address (a few steps from this marker); The Gettysburg Address / The Emancipation Proclamation (a few steps from this marker); To Serve and Defend / Brown V. Board of Education of Topeka (a few steps from this marker); The Declaration of Independence / President John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address (a few steps from this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hyattsville.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 29, 2020. It was originally submitted on February 29, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 61 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 29, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=145915

Paid Advertisement
Apr. 11, 2021